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VIRGIL: Aeneid (Abridged)

    

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VIRGIL: Aeneid (Abridged)

Virgil’s Aeneid, one of the greatest Classical poems, tells the story of Aeneas, son of Priam, after the fall of Troy. His quest is to find the site ‘in the west’ where he will find a new town prophesied to be the seat of a world empire—Rome. This great poem, in a modern translation by Cecil Day Lewis, is superbly read by the great classical actor Paul Scofield, with Jill Balcon.



Disc 1

  The Aeneid
1.   Book I: I tell about war and the hero 00:03:38
2.   Book I: JUNO: Shall I give up Own myself beaten 00:02:27
3.   Book I: AEOLUS: O queen, it is for you to be fully aware what you ask 00:01:32
4.   Book I: AENEAS: Oh, thrice and four times blessed 00:01:53
5.   Book I: NEPTUNE: Does family pride tempt you to such impertinence 00:03:01
6.   Book I: Jupiter from high heaven looked down 00:06:16
7.   Book I: NARRATOR: As they walked through the woods 00:00:42
8.   Book I: Meanwhile the two pressed on apace, where the track pointed 00:01:47
9.   Book I: There was a grove, most genial in its shade 00:06:17
10.   Book I: ILLIONEUS: O queen, who under God, have founded a city 00:00:29
11.   Book I: DIDO: Trojans, put fear away from your hearts, and forget your troubles! 00:02:38
12.   Book I: AENEAS: I am here, before you, the one you look for 00:04:03
13.   Book I: But Venus was meditating a new and artful scheme 00:06:16
14.   Book II: All fell silent now, and their faces were all attention 00:05:07
15.   Book II: AENEAS: We were tricked by cunning and crocodile tears 00:04:01
16.   Book II: So now the sky rolled round, and night raced up from the ocean 00:03:48
17.   Book II: Meantime, Troy was shaken through and through by her last pangs 00:04:03
18.   Book II: AENEAS: Not the Trojans alone paid their account in blood 00:04:38
19.   Book II: AENEAS: Inside the palace, all was confusion, groans, agony 00:07:38
20.   Book II: VENUS: My son, what anguish suprs you to this ungoverned rage 00:06:05
21.   Book II: ANCHISES: O god omnipotent, if any prayers can sway you 00:01:58


Disc 2

  The Aeneid
1.   Book II: AENEAS: Let little Ascanius walk beside me 00:03:00
2.   Book II: AENEAS: For a start, I returned to the shadowed gate in the city wall 00:04:17
3.   Book III: AENEAS: After the gods had seen fit to destroy our Asian empire 00:03:11
4.   Book IV: But now for some while the queen had been growing more grieviously love - sick 00:04:21
5.   Book IV: These words blew to a blaze the spark of love in the queen's heart 00:05:48
6.   Book IV: So now, as Aurora was rising out of her ocean bed 00:04:30
7.   Book IV: Jove Omnipotent bent down his gaze upon Dido's city 00:06:33
8.   Book IV: DIDO: Unfaithful man, did you think you could do such a dreadful thing 00:07:13
9.   Book IV: With these words, Dido suddenly ended, and sick at heart 00:04:49
10.   Book IV: But hapless Dido, frightened out of her wits by her destiny 00:07:44
11.   Book IV: AENAS: Jump to it men! To your watch! Get to the rowing benches! 00:02:00
12.   Book IV: Trembling, distraught by the terrible thing she was doing 00:06:04
13.   Book V: Meanwhile, Aeneas held his fleet on its course through the deep sea 00:02:24
14.   Book VI: At long last they slid to the shores of Euboean Cumae 00:04:20
15.   Book VI: But the Sibyl, not yet submissive to Pheobus, there in her cavern 00:07:14
16.   Book VI: Now the doves, as they fed, flitted on from spot to spot 00:05:47


Disc 3

  The Aeneid
1.   Book VI: A dreadful ferryman looks after the crossing 00:05:28
2.   Book VI: Huge Cerberus, monstrously couched in a cave confronting them 00:03:26
3.   Book VI: AENEAS: Poor unhappy Dido, so the message was true that came to me 00:03:33
4.   Book VI: Side by side they went the twilight way 00:02:22
5.   Book VI: Deep in a green valley stood father Anchises 00:03:02
6.   Book VI: When Anchises had finished he drew his son and the Sibyl 00:06:56
7.   Book VI: ANCHISES: But Romans, never forget that government is your medium! 00:04:24
8.   Book VII: Caeta too, who was nurse to Aeneas 00:06:12
9.   Book VII: Aeneas, his lieutenants and fair Ascanius 00:06:54
10.   Book VII: LATINUS: Trojans - oh yes, your city and line are not unknown to us 00:04:12
11.   Book VII: Latinus received this speech of Illioneus with a gaze 00:02:56
12.   Book VII: But look! From Argos, city of Inachus, now returning 00:06:41
13.   Book VII: QUEEN OF LATINUS: Husband, must our Lavinia be wed to a Trojan, an outcast 00:06:08
14.   Book VII: TURNUS: I am not, as you seem to think, unaware 00:08:28
15.   Book VII: While they fought over the plain there, with neither side prevailing 00:05:36
16.   Book VII: Latinus said no more 00:02:45


Disc 4

  The Aeneid
1.   Book VII: Five great towns establish workshops for the production of armaments 00:01:00
2.   Book VII: NARRATOR: Thus the seeds of war were sown 00:04:14
3.   Book XII: When Turnus saw that the Latins were crushed by defeat 00:06:12
4.   Book XII: The morrow's dawn was just beginning to shower its light 00:04:57
5.   Book XII: AENEAS: Let the sun witness my invocation now 00:06:33
6.   Book XII: So saying, he ran forward and launched a weapon right at the foe 00:06:45
7.   Book XII: Now while the victorious Turnus littered the battlefield with dead 00:04:36
8.   Book XII: When he had spoken, Aeneas sallied forth in his might 00:06:44
9.   Book XII: Aeneas and Turnus tore through the battle 00:05:28
10.   Book XII: A further calamity now befell the war - weary Latins 00:06:22
11.   Book XII: The picture of their changed fortunes struck Turnus dumb, bewildered him 00:02:40
12.   Book XII: So then they drew apart, leaving a space in the midst for combat 00:07:54
13.   Book XII: Meantime the king of all - powerful Olympus addresses Juno 00:01:51
14.   Book XII: JUNO: It is because your wishes, great consort, were known to me 00:07:25
15.   Book XII: Turnus, shaking his head replied 00:06:05

Total Playing Time: 05:15:21






Author(s):
Virgil

Reader(s):
Balcon, Jill; Fitzgerald, Geraldine; McAndrew, John; Scofield, Paul; Stephens, Toby; Thorne, Stephen

Label: Naxos AudioBooks

Genre: Great Epics and Tales

Catalogue No: NA427812

Barcode: 9789626342787

Physical Release: 10/2002

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