About this Recording
2.110537 - MUSICAL JOURNEY (A) - GERMANY: A Musical Tour of Bavaria (NTSC)
English 

A Musical Tour of Bavaria
With music by Georg Philipp Telemann

 

CHAPTER 1

Glass Factory, Frauenau, Bavaria
Glass-blowing is a traditional craft of the Bavarian Forest, with the earliest examples dating back 700 years. Working in glass calls for temperatures of 1200 degrees in ovens fired by quantities of wood, of which there has traditionally been a ready supply.

Music Telemann: Recorder Suite in A minor – I. Ouverture
Telemann’s Suite starts with a French Overture, its stately opening and closing sections framing a fugal section.

CHAPTER 2

Glass Factory, Frauenau, Bavaria
Frauenau is one of the leading centres of the craft of glass-blowing, with its Glass Museum, in which practical demonstrations are given.

Music Telemann: Recorder Suite in A minor – II. Les plaisirs
The second movement of Telemann’s Suite is a rapid dance, Les plaisirs.

CHAPTER 3

Glass Factory, Frauenau, Bavaria
The final stages in the process are shown, with finished examples of the glass-maker’s art.

Music Telemann: Recorder Suite in A minor – III. Air à l’italienne
Telemann’s Suite continues with an Italian air, a movement with a livelier central section.

CHAPTER 4

Glass Factory, Frauenau, Bavaria
The varied possibilities of glass-blowing are shown in the making of a representation of a man, made entirely of glass.

Music Telemann: Recorder Suite in A minor: IV. Premier Menuet
The fourth movement of Telemann’s Suite is the first of two Minuets, this one with a rapid variation for the recorder.

CHAPTER 5

Glass Factory, Frauenau, Bavaria
The long pipes of the glass-blowers are taken out of the furnace, allowing the craftsman to create a new shape, partly by blowing, to expand the molten glass into the required shape, and then by further moulding the vessel.

Music Telemann: Recorder Suite in A minor – V. Deuxième Menuet
The second Minuet of Telemann’s Suite calls for rapid passage-work from the recorder.

CHAPTER 6

Glass Factory, Frauenau, Bavaria
Further refinements of the craft are seen in the ornamentation of a goblet with a celebratory inscription.

Music Telemann: Recorder Suite in A minor – VI. Réjouissance
Réjouissance, a movement title familiar from the work of Telemann’s near contemporary Handel, reflects the implication of its name, Rejoicing.

CHAPTER 7

Glass Factory, Frauenau, Bavaria
An artist adds further decoration to a glass vase.

Music Telemann: Recorder Suite in A minor – VII. Deux Passepieds
Telemann’s Suite continues with a characteristic dance, the Passepied.

CHAPTER 8

Glass Factory, Frauenau, Bavaria
Finished examples of the glass-blower’s art are seen.

Music Telemann: Music: Telemann: Recorder Suite in A minor – VIII. Polonaise
Telemann’s Suite ends with a Polonaise, a stately dance that provides a suitable conclusion to the work.

CHAPTER 9

Schloss Thurn und Taxis, Regensburg
From the later 16th century until the 19th century the Thurn und Taxis family were the postmasters of the Empire, having established the first postal system in Europe. In 1812 the family was given the old abbey of St Emmeran, which became the Thurn und Taxis residence. The exterior is seen and the great staircase and vaulted ceiling of the interior.

Music Telemann: Concerto in F major for 3 Violins (from Tafelmusik) – Allegro
Telemann’s Musique de table was published in 1733, a collection of music divided into three Productions, each one containing an overture with a suite for seven instruments, a quartet, a concerto for seven instruments, a trio, a solo and a conclusion for seven instruments, and advertised as offering a variety of instrumentation. On the title-page where this is announced Telemann declares himself to be Maître de Chapelle to Their Highnesses the Duke of Saxe-Eisenach and the Margrave of Bayreuth and Director of Music in Hamburg. The Concerto in F major is scored for three solo violins and an orchestral ensemble of violin, viola, cello and harpsichord. The opening Allegro at first has all the instruments presenting the ritornello, the material that is to return, punctuating solo entries from each of the three solo violins, in turn.

CHAPTER 10

Schloss Thurn und Taxis, Regensburg
Among works of art at the Schloss Thurn und Taxis is a vivid representation of battle, while a bedchamber, the bed itself mounted on gilded swans, is an indication of the wealth of ornament that the palace boasts.

Music Telemann: Concerto in F major for 3 Violins (from Tafelmusik) – Largo
The solo instruments enter in imitation of each other in the D minor Largo, its outer sections framing a central passage for the solo instruments, vestigially accompanied.

CHAPTER 11

Schloss Thurn und Taxis, Regensburg
One of the public rooms in the Schloss Thurn und Taxis reveals an elaborate chandelier, ornamented with putti, and mirrors on the walls, reflecting the light in a setting of great magnificence.

Music Telemann: Concerto in F major for 3 Violins (from Tafelmusik) – Vivace
The style of the three-movement Italian concerto, as perfected in Venice by Vivaldi, continues in the final Vivace.

CHAPTER 12

Abbey of St George and St Martin, Weltenburg, near Kelheim
The monastery at Weltenburg was founded in the 7th century by German and Irish or Scottish monks. The present building, on a peninsula in the Danube, dates largely from the 18th century and can be approached from Regensburg by water.

Music Telemann: Concerto in E flat major for 2 Horns (from Tafelmusik) – Maestoso
The Concerto in E flat major is scored for two horns, strings and continuo, and is found in Part III of Telemann’s Tafelmusik. There is room for contrast in the slow first movement, an introduction to a work in church style.

CHAPTER 13

Abbey of St George and St Martin, Weltenburg, near Kelheim
The monastery façade is seen, with the figure of a saint above and the necessary gargoyles. The building dates from the early 18th century and was the work of the Asam brothers.

Music Telemann: Concerto in E flat major for 2 Horns (from Tafelmusik) – Allegro
The second movement of the Concerto in E flat major is a cheerful Allegro, with passages for the horns alone and interesting violin figuration. The movement is in two sections, the second starting with an excursion into C minor.

CHAPTER 14

Abbey of St George and St Martin, Weltenburg, near Kelheim
The exterior of the monastery is further explored, with its statuary and gardens.

Music Telemann: Concerto in E flat major for 2 Horns (from Tafelmusik) – Grave
The third movement of the Concerto in E flat major is a C minor slow movement, marked Grave, which gives the horn-players time to take breath, allowing them principally to mark points of rest for the two violins in their contrapuntal progress.

CHAPTER 15

Abbey of St George and St Martin, Weltenburg, near Kelheim
The interior of the abbey church is a characteristic example of Bavarian baroque ornament, its gilding, statues, putti and paintings the work of the Asam brothers, the whole celebrated as one of the best baroque churches in Germany.

Music Telemann: Concerto in E flat major for 2 Horns (from Tafelmusik) – Vivace
The Concerto in E flat major ends with a hunting gigue, again in two repeated sections.


Keith Anderson

Recordings
Recorder Suite: Jiři Stivín, Recorder, Capella Istropolitana conducted by Richard Edlinger.
Concerto for 3 Violins: Anna Hoelblingova, Quido Hoelbling, and Alexander Jablokov, Violins, Capella Istropolitana conducted by Richard Edlinger.
Concerto for 2 Horns: Zdeněk and Bedřich Tylšar, Horns, Capella Istropolitana conducted by Richard Edlinger. [All from Naxos 8.550156]


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