About this Recording
76036-2 - SOUTH-AMERICA Takillacta: Andean Songs
English 

Andean songs

Takillacta: Music of the People

1. Pampa Lirima (R. Marquez) ……………………………………….

4:53

2. Laya(x) (Takillacta)………………………………………….. ……..

0:55

3. Huajra (A. Yupanqui)………………………………………………..

3:34

4. Tierra (O. Britos) ……………………………………………………

4:17

5. Balseros del Titicaca(+) (Traditional)……………………………...

3:59

6. Alma Andina(*) (Takillacta)……………...…………………………

6:56

7. Papel de Plata(+) (Traditional)…………………………………….

4:06

8. Preludio Andino (M. Najt)………………..…………………….…...

3:12

9. Camino de Llamas (U. Ramos)……….…………………………...

4:20

10. Guambrita Dulce(ø) (A. Flores)…………………………………..

5:32

11. Valz del sur del Bronx (R. Silva)……………..…………………..

4:52

12. Angel Jaco’s Song (H. Taninaka)…………..……………………

8:13

Total playing time: 52:09
All songs interpreted and arranged by Takillacta.
In the Quechua language, Takillacta means "song of the people."

(x) "Laya" means, in Argentine Gaucho slang, a colorful or distinct characteristic of a person or thing. This style of music is usually played by the Gauchos on the guitar.
(+) These are traditional songs from the Andes. The type of rhythm is called "Huayno."
(*) This song is from an anonymous Andes melody called "Auqui Auqui." The flute and bombo rhythm at the beginning of the song is a Baguala, traditional in the north region of Argentina.
(ø) This song uses a rhythm and melody from Ecuador called "San Juanito."

BAND MEMBERS
Arturo Flores (Perú): flutes, quenas, sikus, sampoñas.
Francisco Rodriguez (Chile): guitar, vocals.
Leider Dorado (Colombia): charango.
Lionel Sanders (Argentina): percussion, drums.
Hideji Taninaka (Japan): acoustic bass.
Maurizio Najt (Argentina): piano.
Zaida Aguilar (Perú): guest vocalist on Papel de Plata.

Produced by Lionel Sanders
Engineered by Perkin Barnes and Ken Shillington on ProTools
Mastered by Ronnie Thomas at MasterMix
Original drawing by Francisco ("Pancho") Rodriguez
Cover photo and insert pictures by Julio Sanders
Polaroid photos by Lionel Sanders
Recorded at 6/8 Studios in NYC, May 2002

INSTRUMENTS
Pre-Columbian flutes were originally made out of clay, bones or silver. In modern times they are made of bamboo cane. Two types are used on this album:

Sikus (also known as pan flutes) are bamboo pipes of different lengths lashed together with leather or string. Each pipe sounds a single tone when blown. Because of tuning limitations, it is traditional for a single melody to be executed by two or more players trading notes from sikus in different keys. Modern sikus are built on a chromatic scale so that one player can play all the tones on a single instrument. Each size of sikus has a different name. The ones used most frequently on this album are sampoñas.

Quena. This is a single piece of bamboo. It is played vertically, with the fingers covering (or uncovering) nine holes. Instead of blowing into a mouthpiece, the player blows through a notch in the top of the flute.

Charango is a stringed instrument created to resemble the Spanish guitar. It is similar to a mandolin. Traditionally the body was made from an Armadillo shell attached to a wooden neck, with five unison pairs of nylon or metal strings.

Bombo is a low, deep percussion instrument from Argentina. It is carved from a tree trunk and covered with goat or cow skin. A wooden rim holds it together with leather strings that can be tightened to change the tuning.

Spanish guitar, piano, acoustic bass and drum set are the modern instruments used on this album. Their juxtaposition with the traditional Andean instruments is the flavor and color on which Takillacta builds its sound.

Papel de Plata

 

Spanish:

English:

Papel de plata quisierá,
Plumita de oro tuvierá,
Para escribir una carta
A mi negra mas queridá.
Hay palomita hay corazoncito
Hasta cuando estare yo sufriendo?

Paper of silver I wish I had
A feather of gold I wish I had,
To write a letter
To my woman most beloved.
Ay, tender dove, ay, little heart
Until when will I stay suffering?

 

Tierra (poem) by Francisco Rodriguez

 

Spanish:

English:

Camino tu cuerpo tierra
Me mojo en tu azul
Me como tu verde
Deshago mis dias en tu Amarillo
Paso a paso con pies y guitarra
Con vos y quenacho
Tomo cada sueño que me das
Y lo hago flor
Piedrecita de rio o canción.

I walk your body, earth
I soak in your blue
I taste your green
Undo my days in your yellow
Step by step with feet and guitar
With voice and flute
I grab each dream you give me
And I make it a flower,
A little pebble or a song.

History of the group and the music
It dates back to the mid-eighties, when I was a newcomer to New York City. One day I was walking down through Soho and heard music that was familiar, but with a distinctive flavor in the sound. It turned out to be some of my future bandmates playing on the street. What I was hearing was a new way of expressing the folklore of our latitudes: Andean highlands and valleys; Patagonia; South American pampas; and the Tateyama Mountains of Japan.

We, the members of Takillacta, come from different countries and musical backgrounds: Perú, Colombia, Chile, Argentina, and Japan.

Beneath the sound of our music are the life stories and traditions brought by each of us from those distinct places. This project is a reflection of those backgrounds and the folklore carried in each of us, the memories of which have nurtured us through our years of living in New York, the city where you can’t escape blending with so many people and cultures. This album is dedicated to the native people of the Americas, and to artists and poets of all backgrounds who embrace tradition while letting it grow into new forms.

Lionel Sanders
New York, NY
June 2002


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