^ Back to Top
^ Back to Discography
Classical Music Home

The World's Leading Classical Music Group

Email Password  
Not a subscriber yet?
Keyword Search
in
 

EDITH FARNADI

Edith Farnadi was a child prodigy first receiving lessons from her mother, herself a pianist, before entering the Liszt Academy in Budapest at the age of nine. It was there that she studied under Arnold Székely, Leo Weiner, Béla Bartók and Ilona Deckers-Küszler. At twelve she played Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 1 Op. 15, conducting the orchestra from the keyboard. During her years at the Liszt Academy she was awarded the Liszt Prize twice, and after gaining her diploma, Farnadi returned as a professor. After World War II she settled in Austria and joined the staff of the Music Academy of Graz where she remained until 1970, combining a teaching and performing career. Whilst still a student, Farnadi formed a partnership with the great Hungarian violinist Jenő Hubay, and later played with Bronisław Huberman and André Gertler. Farnadi performed with the Berlin Philharmonic, Concertgebouw, and London Philharmonic Orchestras, with such conductors as Karl Böhm, Ernest Ansermet and Adrian Boult.

During the 1950s Farnadi made a series of LP recordings for Westminster. These include music by Liszt, Rachmaninov, Tchaikovsky, Bartók, Grieg and Franck; the latter two composers being represented by violin sonatas recorded with André Gertler. Farnadi’s most important recordings are those of Liszt, and her complete series of the Hungarian Rhapsodies (Nos 1–19 plus the Rhapsodie Espagnole) from 1953 was reissued on compact disc by MCA in 1991. Farnadi has a sure technique and delivers the music without bombast, avoiding overblown performances. However, her other Liszt recordings still await reissue and among these are a complete recording of the Années de pèlerinage, the Piano Sonata in B minor, the first Mephisto-Waltz, the Grandes Études de Paganini, the Ungarische Bildnisse, a disc of opera transcriptions (including the overture to Wagner’s Tannhäuser), the complete Soirées de Vienne, and the two piano concertos which she recorded with Hermann Scherchen (and later again with Adrian Boult). Farnadi recorded Bartók’s Mikrokosmos on three LPs, and his Piano Concertos Nos 2 and 3, also with Scherchen. One of her lesser-known discs is one of her best. Recorded in London in June 1955, it is of paraphrases of works by Johann Strauss, including the famous three by Godowsky, and Farnadi has the style and technique to play these with charm and subtlety.

© Naxos Rights International Ltd. — Jonathan Summers (A–Z of Pianists, Naxos 8.558107–10).


Albums featuring this artist are available for download from ClassicsOnline.com
Role: Classical Artist 
Album Title
Catalogue No  Work Category 
BARTOK: Mikrokosmos, Vols. 1 and 2 (Farnadi) (1956) Naxos Classical Archives
9.80193
Instrumental
BARTOK: Mikrokosmos, Vols. 3 and 4 (Farnadi) (1956) Naxos Classical Archives
9.80194
Instrumental
BARTOK: Mikrokosmos, Vols. 5 and 6 (Farnadi) (1956) Naxos Classical Archives
9.80195
Instrumental
WOMEN AT THE PIANO - AN ANTHOLOGY OF HISTORIC PERFORMANCES, Vol. 4 (1921-1955) Naxos Historical
8.111218
Instrumental





 
 
 View Albums
 
 




 Tell a Friend |  Bookmark this page Digg It |  Bookmark this page Del.icio.us. |  Add to Facebook Facebook |  FURL FURL |  Add to MySpace MySpace |  Stumbleupon StumbleUpon |  Twitter Twitter

Famous Composers Quick Link:
Bach | Beethoven | Chopin | Dowland | Handel | Haydn | Mozart | Glazunov | Schumann | R Strauss | Vivaldi
7:35:38 PM, 22 December 2014
All Naxos Historical, Naxos Classical Archives, Naxos Jazz, Folk and Rock Legends and Naxos Nostalgia titles are not available in the United States and some titles may not be available in Australia and Singapore because these countries have copyright laws that provide or may provide for terms of protection for sound recordings that differ from the rest of the world.
Copyright © 2014 Naxos Digital Services Ltd. All rights reserved.     Terms of Use     Privacy Policy
-208-
Classical Music Home
NOTICE: This site was unavailable for several hours on Saturday, June 25th 2011 due to some unexpected but essential maintenance work. We apologize for any inconvenience.