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Australian Hi-Fi, July 2006

In 1988 a new classical label appeared, selling CDs at one-third of the usual price. The orchestras were provincial, the conductors and soloists obscure. The flow of discs came from Hong Kong and seemed to be pitched at the Asian market. Critics ignored them. They were made to change their tune when Naxos put out a cycle of Bruckner symphonies that drew instant comparison to old masters­Klemperer, Karajan, Furtwangler. From the opening shimmer of the fifth symphony, the phrasing was immaculate, the pacing idiomatic and the passion utterly absorbing.

The conductor was a white-haired wanderer called Georg Tintner. Exiled in 1938 from Vienna, where he was on the Volksoper payroll, he had found refuge but scant reward in New Zealand, Australia and finally Canada.

Tintner approached Bruckner without condescension to the composer's peasant naivete, presenting him as a prophet of mortal agony and spiritual ecstasy. Suitably inspired, the Royal Scottish National Orchestra played like Viennese virtuosi and the symphonies sold like ice creams in summer. The 5th, which launched the cycle, changed the status of Bruckner and the state of the record industry forever.



Australian Hi-Fi, July 2006

In 1988 a new classical label appeared, selling CDs at one-third of the usual price. The orchestras were provincial, the conductors and soloists obscure. The flow of discs came from Hong Kong and seemed to be pitched at the Asian market. Critics ignored them. They were made to change their tune when Naxos put out a cycle of Bruckner symphonies that drew instant comparison to old masters­Klemperer, Karajan, Furtwangler. From the opening shimmer of the fifth symphony, the phrasing was immaculate, the pacing idiomatic and the passion utterly absorbing.

The conductor was a white-haired wanderer called Georg Tintner. Exiled in 1938 from Vienna, where he was on the Volksoper payroll, he had found refuge but scant reward in New Zealand, Australia and finally Canada.

Tintner approached Bruckner without condescension to the composer's peasant naivete, presenting him as a prophet of mortal agony and spiritual ecstasy. Suitably inspired, the Royal Scottish National Orchestra played like Viennese virtuosi and the symphonies sold like ice creams in summer. The 5th, which launched the cycle, changed the status of Bruckner and the state of the record industry forever.



Fanfare

"This is a Bruckner Fifth with distinctive character and personality....Naxos provides this disc with an extremely wide dynamic range...this is Bruckner that makes complete musical sense...The Royal Scottish Orchestra seems to be unearthing this great work as it plays, and imbues the proceedings with an infectious sense of discovery".



Gramophone

These are the hills Tintner has spent a lifetime walking and he knows how to pace himself"





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