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David J. Baker
Opera News, June 2013

…these four discs from Newton Classics reissue formidable work from [Souzay’s] prime in the 1960s. The impressive, flexible voice, though a bit pressed in some high-ranging passages, is more robust and reliable than it would be on the later EMI editions of some of this material, while the partnership with pianist Dalton Baldwin is in full flower.

Baldwin scores dazzling effects in Ravel’s virtuoso exoticism, as he does at special pointillist moments in Poulenc or in his coloring of Fauré’s harmony in La Bonne Chanson to suggest the reflecting waters evoked in Verlaine’s text. The list of highlights could continue at length; and the pianist’s brilliance seems always an impetus for the singing. © 2013 Opera News Read complete review



Lynn René Bayley
Fanfare, January 2011

As many problems as I had with Newton’s two-CD release of Gérard Souzay’s Schubert, I have nothing but praise for this one—excepting the fact that no texts or translations are given, which means the target market is apparently only those collectors who know who Souzay and these songs are. That’s a pity, because the purity of his singing and the directness of his approach, which go straight to the heart, are rare qualities in today’s world of staged Lieder and chanson recitals where singers are also expected to act and dance.

This set combines several recital discs. In addition to all-Fauré and Duparc recitals, it includes the potpourri album Souzay recorded in the Netherlands in July 1963 and issued on LP as A Century of French Song (Philips PHS 900-132), a disc that was in my collection for 30 years before I burned it to CD about a decade ago. I’m happy to have it in pristine digital sound.

Souzay often sounded like an actor reading lines when he sang Schubert or Schumann (his magical early Dictherliebe excepted), but in French song he was a master. He was also a style-changer, as before he appeared on the scene, singers of chanson were not expected to interpret the songs but to sing them in a very direct style as if speaking to you. Souzay borrowed the more interpretive style of his German brethren to convey more emotional involvement, and we tend to forget how, for many years, he was vilified by Francophiles for daring to mess with tradition. That his is now the accepted norm in listening to this music goes to the credit of many younger singers who preferred his approach and carried it into the 1970s, 80s, and 90s. Of course, one’s individual taste has a great deal to do with one’s acceptance of this style, just as it does for those singers who followed his footsteps. A bit too far, and emotional commitment could easily become pathos or bathos.

With apparent access to the original master tapes, Newton’s transfers are beautiful and technically flawless. Again, I decry the lack of texts, but you can always go—as I often do—to the Lieder and Art Song Texts Page online (recmusic.org/lieder). And while you’re there, please make a small donation (it’s non-profit and needs a little help).



Jens F. Laurson
Ionarts, December 2010

# 7 Best Recordings of 2010

This is a re-re-issue, at least…but very welcome for a host of reasons. Gérard Souzay’s Mélodies ranked high among my 2004 choices of Best Reissues already; that was the (expensive) re-issue of all of his Duparc (and a few others) on one disc. Now Newton Classics, a new kid on the classical re-issuing block about which I will report more in depth in the new year, issues the release as it had once appeared on Philips—the whole 4 disc set of all the Mélodies he recorded for that company. What I wrote about the single disc version in 2004 still remains valid: “Gérard Souzay may be old fashioned in his singing, but it sure is gorgeous. I love the songs of [the neglected mad genius] Henri Duparc…and though the sound is not Hi-Fi, the quality is such that every bit of his deeply felt, noble singing of mélodies comes through. This was the Gramophone Record of the Year winner among reissues, and it’s not difficult to hear why.” Now with added Fauré, Poulenc, Ravel, Leguerney, Hahn, Gounod, Chabrier, and Bizet.



John Quinn
MusicWeb International, December 2010

Bargain of the Month

I suspect that many of the releases to date on the Newton Classics label are recordings licensed from major record labels who themselves have no plans to reissue the material. These recordings of mélodies were made by Gérard Souzay for what is now Universal International Music between 1960 and 1968. If Universal has no further use for these recordings that’s a sad indication of the fate that has befallen the once-proud major labels. However, we must be grateful that they’ve allowed Newton Classics to give these performances a new lease of life for it would be nothing short of scandalous were these recordings to remain locked away in the vaults.

Gérard Souzay (1918–2004) was a pupil of the soprano, Claire Croiza and, as Roger Nichols points out in his appreciation of Souzay in the booklet, it was Croiza in particular who instilled in Souzay the importance of words in singing. Throughout these four generously filled discs one hears Souzay enunciate the texts with clarity, understanding and meaning. It was Pierre Bernac, the great baritone, who first encouraged Souzay to take up singing and it’s rather fitting that this should have been the case since Bernac and Souzay between them did so much to establish mélodies as a key element in the art song repertoire. Nowadays there are many gifted exponents of French repertoire—by no means all of them Francophone—and mélodies by Debussy, Fauré, Poulenc and Ravel are regarded as central repertoire but it wasn’t always so and Souzay must be given a great deal of credit for making the wider musical world really sit up and take notice of the art songs of his native land. Here we have no less than 120 examples of his art in what is, I think, a collection of major importance.

Given that so many songs are included in this anthology all the reviewer can do is to point out a few highlights. The whole of the first disc and part of the second is devoted to Fauré. The very first item proves to be a harbinger of what is to follow. La Chanson du pêcheur, a magnificent song, is given a wonderful, intense reading. All the requisite feeling is there but the interpretation is never overstated. And, as we shall discover again and again as we dig deeper into this set, the words are beautifully clear. Les Berceaux offers a demonstration of another of Souzay’s great qualities; his ability to sing a seamless legato line. Here the line rises to a powerful, effortless climax, the voice evenly produced throughout its compass. By contrast Le Secret is delivered with simple eloquence. In this performance everything seems to be just as it should be, surely a classic case of art concealing art.

Further on Souzay gives a marvellous reading of La Bonne Chanson. One item in this cycle that particularly caught my attention was ‘Puisque l’aube grandit’. In this song the vocal line often lies very high but this poses no problems to Souzay. In ‘La lune blanche’ both Souzay and pianist Dalton Baldwin display graceful musicianship and they treat us to a superb rendition of this wonderful song. In the final song in this cycle, ‘L’hiver a cessé’, Souzay conveys perfectly the sense of joyfulness at the change of season.

Mirages is a most subtle collection of songs and Souzay’s interpretation is masterful. His account of ‘Reflets dans l’eau’ is a wonderfully controlled piece of singing; the line is superb and I admired the suppressed intensity of his delivery. He’s just as impressive in ‘Jardin nocturne’. The performance of L’Horizon chimérique is equally fine, not least in his gentle, dignified rendition of ‘Diane, Séléné’.

The remainder of disc two is devoted to Poulenc. These songs require a very different approach to those of Fauré but it seems to me that Souzay is just as successful in them. His excellent diction is often put to the test in some of Poulenc’s tongue-twisters such as ‘Chanson du clair tamis’ and ‘Les gars qui vont à la fête’. In both of these songs a delightful sense of fun is conveyed. I also appreciated Souzay’s narrative ability in ‘Le mendicant’. Two sharply contrasted offerings from the very end of the Poulenc section call for comment. Air vif is another of those will-o’-the-wisp Poulenc songs that require—and here receive—expert articulation from singer and pianist. Yet a few moments later we experience the touching, almost sentimental side of Poulenc in Priez pour paix. Here Souzay sings with simple eloquence; his restraint and sincerity penetrate to the heart of this moving song.

There’s also a great deal to admire in his interpretations of Ravel. These are the latest recordings in the set, dating from 1968. Souzay offers a marvellously nuanced account of Mélodies populaires grecques. Especially noteworthy is the languorous ‘Chanson des cueilleuses de lentisques’, where the singer’s calm and seamless legato is exquisite. The songs in Histoires naturelles are well characterised yet with no hint of caricature. It may be invidious to single out any of the individual performances in this cycle but ‘Le Cygne’ is as graceful as it should be, with a marvellous, liquid accompaniment from Baldwin, while Souzay brings all the necessary hauteur to ‘La Pintade’.

At the end of this disc comes a pair of songs that were completely new to me by Jacques Leguerney. The first, ‘Ma douce jouvence est passée’ is a slow, expressive song in which the vocal line unfolds over a piano part that consists of a series of chords. Souzay’s command of line is a decided asset here and he ensures that the song achieves a noble climax. The other Leguerney song is a lively creation calling for just the sort of vivid characterisation that Souzay is so well equipped to provide. His account of Hahn’s L’Heure exquise is, appropriately enough, exquisite. It’s as if Souzay is communing with himself. The soft high notes, all beautifully placed in the head voice, display his marvellous control.

The final disc includes a dozen songs by Duparc, all set down in 1962. Souzay does all of them extremely well. L’Invitation au voyage is a magnificent song and I greatly admired the intensity of Souzay’s performance. Intelligently placed in the programme, the very next song offers a complete contrast for Sérénade Florentine is a soothing lullaby and Souzay’s controlled delivery is just right. There’s a small slip in the track-listing in the booklet, which transposes La Vie antérieure and Lamento; I’ve shown the songs in the order in which they appear on the disc in the list at the end of this review. La Vie antérieure was the last song that Duparc composed. Souzay is quite superb here. His singing in the first stanza and again at the very end of the piece is elevated and dignified while he invests the second and third stanzas with just the right degree of passion. Souzay was a considerable interpreter of Duparc and these recordings are to be treasured.

The collection closes with a number of miscellaneous songs, recorded in 1963. In general these aren’t as significant as compositions as the others in this collection but Souzay and Baldwin still apply all their considerable skills to them. The Gounod pieces are charming and worth hearing while the two Chabrier offerings are delightful. The little Bizet song is full of spirit and is sung with winning impetuosity by Souzay. I can’t recall hearing the Roussel items before and it’s good to hear them done by such a masterful interpreter.

These discs play for a little short of five hours and they contain an embarrassment of riches. Though the recordings were made over a period of eight years Souzay’s voice is remarkably consistent and he is a completely reliable and instinctive guide to these songs. I mean no disrespect to the many gifted singers from around the world who regularly include mélodies in their recitals but what a delight it is to hear a Francophone singer, and a great one at that, in this repertoire. Throughout the set the contribution of Dalton Baldwin is magnificent and though, inevitably, the listener’s attention is drawn time and again to the singer Baldwin’s pianism is extremely distinguished. All lovers of French music and all connoisseurs of great singing should lose no time in acquiring this set for it represents an unmissable bargain, even without texts and translations—though these are available from the label’s website.

I can do no better than to conclude by quoting the final sentence from the note by Roger Nichols. “Forty years on, Souzay’s singing remains not only a thing of beauty, but an eternal lesson in applying both intelligence and imagination.” Really, that says it all and I venture to suggest that no one who invests in these wonderful discs will find that they disagree with Mr Nichols.




John Quinn
MusicWeb International, December 2010

I suspect that many of the releases to date on the Newton Classics label are recordings licensed from major record labels who themselves have no plans to reissue the material. These recordings of mélodies were made by Gérard Souzay for what is now Universal International Music between 1960 and 1968. If Universal has no further use for these recordings that’s a sad indication of the fate that has befallen the once-proud major labels. However, we must be grateful that they’ve allowed Newton Classics to give these performances a new lease of life for it would be nothing short of scandalous were these recordings to remain locked away in the vaults.

Gérard Souzay (1918–2004) was a pupil of the soprano, Claire Croiza and, as Roger Nichols points out in his appreciation of Souzay in the booklet, it was Croiza in particular who instilled in Souzay the importance of words in singing. Throughout these four generously filled discs one hears Souzay enunciate the texts with clarity, understanding and meaning. It was Pierre Bernac, the great baritone, who first encouraged Souzay to take up singing and it’s rather fitting that this should have been the case since Bernac and Souzay between them did so much to establish mélodies as a key element in the art song repertoire. Nowadays there are many gifted exponents of French repertoire—by no means all of them Francophone—and mélodies by Debussy, Fauré, Poulenc and Ravel are regarded as central repertoire but it wasn’t always so and Souzay must be given a great deal of credit for making the wider musical world really sit up and take notice of the art songs of his native land. Here we have no less than 120 examples of his art in what is, I think, a collection of major importance.

Given that so many songs are included in this anthology all the reviewer can do is to point out a few highlights. The whole of the first disc and part of the second is devoted to Fauré. The very first item proves to be a harbinger of what is to follow. La Chanson du pêcheur, a magnificent song, is given a wonderful, intense reading. All the requisite feeling is there but the interpretation is never overstated. And, as we shall discover again and again as we dig deeper into this set, the words are beautifully clear. Les Berceaux offers a demonstration of another of Souzay’s great qualities; his ability to sing a seamless legato line. Here the line rises to a powerful, effortless climax, the voice evenly produced throughout its compass. By contrast Le Secret is delivered with simple eloquence. In this performance everything seems to be just as it should be, surely a classic case of art concealing art.

Further on Souzay gives a marvellous reading of La Bonne Chanson. One item in this cycle that particularly caught my attention was ‘Puisque l’aube grandit’. In this song the vocal line often lies very high but this poses no problems to Souzay. In ‘La lune blanche’ both Souzay and pianist Dalton Baldwin display graceful musicianship and they treat us to a superb rendition of this wonderful song. In the final song in this cycle, ‘L’hiver a cessé’, Souzay conveys perfectly the sense of joyfulness at the change of season.

Mirages is a most subtle collection of songs and Souzay’s interpretation is masterful. His account of ‘Reflets dans l’eau’ is a wonderfully controlled piece of singing; the line is superb and I admired the suppressed intensity of his delivery. He’s just as impressive in ‘Jardin nocturne’. The performance of L’Horizon chimérique is equally fine, not least in his gentle, dignified rendition of ‘Diane, Séléné’.

The remainder of disc two is devoted to Poulenc. These songs require a very different approach to those of Fauré but it seems to me that Souzay is just as successful in them. His excellent diction is often put to the test in some of Poulenc’s tongue-twisters such as ‘Chanson du clair tamis’ and ‘Les gars qui vont à la fête’. In both of these songs a delightful sense of fun is conveyed. I also appreciated Souzay’s narrative ability in ‘Le mendicant’. Two sharply contrasted offerings from the very end of the Poulenc section call for comment. Air vif is another of those will-o’-the-wisp Poulenc songs that require—and here receive—expert articulation from singer and pianist. Yet a few moments later we experience the touching, almost sentimental side of Poulenc in Priez pour paix. Here Souzay sings with simple eloquence; his restraint and sincerity penetrate to the heart of this moving song.

There’s also a great deal to admire in his interpretations of Ravel. These are the latest recordings in the set, dating from 1968. Souzay offers a marvellously nuanced account of Mélodies populaires grecques. Especially noteworthy is the languorous ‘Chanson des cueilleuses de lentisques’, where the singer’s calm and seamless legato is exquisite. The songs in Histoires naturelles are well characterised yet with no hint of caricature. It may be invidious to single out any of the individual performances in this cycle but ‘Le Cygne’ is as graceful as it should be, with a marvellous, liquid accompaniment from Baldwin, while Souzay brings all the necessary hauteur to ‘La Pintade’.

At the end of this disc comes a pair of songs that were completely new to me by Jacques Leguerney. The first, ‘Ma douce jouvence est passée’ is a slow, expressive song in which the vocal line unfolds over a piano part that consists of a series of chords. Souzay’s command of line is a decided asset here and he ensures that the song achieves a noble climax. The other Leguerney song is a lively creation calling for just the sort of vivid characterisation that Souzay is so well equipped to provide. His account of Hahn’s L’Heure exquise is, appropriately enough, exquisite. It’s as if Souzay is communing with himself. The soft high notes, all beautifully placed in the head voice, display his marvellous control.

The final disc includes a dozen songs by Duparc, all set down in 1962. Souzay does all of them extremely well. L’Invitation au voyage is a magnificent song and I greatly admired the intensity of Souzay’s performance. Intelligently placed in the programme, the very next song offers a complete contrast for Sérénade Florentine is a soothing lullaby and Souzay’s controlled delivery is just right. There’s a small slip in the track-listing in the booklet, which transposes La Vie antérieure and Lamento; I’ve shown the songs in the order in which they appear on the disc in the list at the end of this review. La Vie antérieure was the last song that Duparc composed. Souzay is quite superb here. His singing in the first stanza and again at the very end of the piece is elevated and dignified while he invests the second and third stanzas with just the right degree of passion. Souzay was a considerable interpreter of Duparc and these recordings are to be treasured.

The collection closes with a number of miscellaneous songs, recorded in 1963. In general these aren’t as significant as compositions as the others in this collection but Souzay and Baldwin still apply all their considerable skills to them. The Gounod pieces are charming and worth hearing while the two Chabrier offerings are delightful. The little Bizet song is full of spirit and is sung with winning impetuosity by Souzay. I can’t recall hearing the Roussel items before and it’s good to hear them done by such a masterful interpreter.

These discs play for a little short of five hours and they contain an embarrassment of riches. Though the recordings were made over a period of eight years Souzay’s voice is remarkably consistent and he is a completely reliable and instinctive guide to these songs. I mean no disrespect to the many gifted singers from around the world who regularly include mélodies in their recitals but what a delight it is to hear a Francophone singer, and a great one at that, in this repertoire. Throughout the set the contribution of Dalton Baldwin is magnificent and though, inevitably, the listener’s attention is drawn time and again to the singer Baldwin’s pianism is extremely distinguished. All lovers of French music and all connoisseurs of great singing should lose no time in acquiring this set for it represents an unmissable bargain, even without texts and translations—though these are available from the label’s website.

I can do no better than to conclude by quoting the final sentence from the note by Roger Nichols. “Forty years on, Souzay’s singing remains not only a thing of beauty, but an eternal lesson in applying both intelligence and imagination.” Really, that says it all and I venture to suggest that no one who invests in these wonderful discs will find that they disagree with Mr Nichols.



Barry Brenesal
Fanfare, November 2010

The internationally famed teacher and composer Jean Berger once wrote: “Claire Croiza gave a recital. … For years it had been said of her, she had no voice and what she does have is ugly. … But I, as all present, walked out in a trance. We had been given the songs, to perfection. … The more improvised it seemed, the more studied it had to be.” Croiza was Souzay’s teacher in learning the art of interpreting mélodies. Vanni-Marcoux and Etcheverry built the baritone’s technique, but it was Croiza who provided the tools to understand what he sang, and communicate that understanding. Souzay, a most conscientious artist, followed along this path through the rest of his life.

The better part of two discs are devoted to Fauré’s songs, of whom Souzay was a master. (Croiza studied these with Fauré, and performed the eponymous role in the composer’s opera Pénélope when it was revived following his death. A case can be made for a direct line of transmission out of this.) They are almost without exception outstanding. Listen, for example, to the floating tone in Fauré’s Mandoline, to the purity of the vowels in “écouteuses,” to the perpetually light tone that goes so well through three verses—only to become lighter still at the start of the fourth verse, “Tourbillonent dans l’extase.” The surface, here, is the depth, and Souzay allows nothing to disturb that surface even as he carefully articulates the text, and accomplishes marvels with his well-supported breath.

There are many other songs where a different set of virtues come to the fore, conveying a naturalness of expression that is the product of artifice itself. This occurs repeatedly in the causal, conversational rise and fall of the tone on the lines “Éclos de candeurs de cygne / Et des rougeurs de femme-enfant” in Une Sainte en son aureole; in the extraordinary articulation and carefully controlled dynamics of Prison, with its focused outbursts; and in the subtle way Souzay has with word rhythms in Eau vivante. It all comes together perhaps best in Crépuscule, with the balance between line, text, color, and shifting dynamics providing an interpretative experience that deserves detailed analysis in an essay, not a review.

As much can be said of many of the 12 songs he performs by Duparc, and the song cycles by Fauré’s favorite pupil, Ravel, with especial praise for the Chanson romanesque from Don Quichotte à Dulcinée. It shows Souzay digging deeply into the roots of his voice, as he would put it, sounding more like a resonant bass, achieving an undercurrent of humor through a most earnest emphasis of Morand’s text: the heavy Ms in “ma Dame,” “le blame,” and “Et je mourrais” across successive lines, for instance, and the almost alveolar trill of the R in the last of the three, as well.

That humor is for the most part missing from the Poulenc selections, however. Slower pieces of a more serious musical mien, such as C’est le joli printemps and Tout disparut, receive distinguished interpretations, but the Dadaist silliness that was another, very prominent side of the composer goes almost unnoticed. Souzay studied with Bernac, but that had more to do with singing than interpretation, and he misses a sense of vivacity, as well as a chameleon-like emotional range, that’s required in Aussi bien que les cigales, and Les Gars qui vont à la fête. The articulation is certainly there; you can almost transcribe what the baritone sings, but the vein of light-hearted nonsense doesn’t get mined. Still, the Poulenc only forms one part of a single CD, and these pieces less than half of that. It would be unrealistic to expect any artist to get the full measure of every song he or she sings across a very full lifetime, and mean-spirited to demand this from one who has delivered the last word on so much he committed to disc.

The sound quality is in general fine, well balanced between singer and accompanist, with just enough resonance to make the voice “take” in the studio or hall, yet not drown Souzay’s fine enunciation. Analog hiss is kept to a minimum. Newton Classics includes full texts without translations on its own Web site. Lovers of French song would do well to consider purchasing this collection, especially at its budget price.



Gramophone, November 2010

BACH, J.S.: Great Choral Music (Munchinger) NC8802001
DVOŘÁK, A.: Symphonies Nos. 8 and 9 / In Nature’s Realm / The Noonday Witch (Vienna Philharmonic, Ozawa) NC8802003
HAYDN, F.J.: Symphonies Nos. 6-8 (Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, Marriner) NC8802006
Oboe Concertos (Baroque) – BACH, J.S. / TELEMANN, G.P. / MARCELLO, A. / SAMMARTINI, G. / ALBINONI, T.G. / LOTTI, A. / BENJAMIN, A. (Holliger) NC8802005
Vocal Recital: Souzay, Gerard – FAURE, G. / POULENC, F. / RAVEL, M. / LEGUERNEY, J. / HAHN, R. / DUPARC, H. / GOUNOD, C.-F. (Melodies Francaises) NC8802007

Newton Classics is an attractively produced budget-price label that has been drawing musically worthwhile and technically well engineered material from the archives of Universal Music. I’ve already mentioned Karl Münchinger’s Bach B minor Mass which has appeared on Newton as part of a nine-disc collection of great Bach choral works (previously on Decca). The collection also includes the St John and St Matthew Passions, the Christmas Oratorio and the Cantata BWV10. Aside from Müncinger’s dependably solid and often musically sensitive conducting of the Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra, there’s the singing, much of it of exceptional quality, especially in the St Matthew Passion whre Peter Pears is the Evangelist and Hermann Prey is Christus, with Elly Ameling, Marga Höffgen, Fritz Wunderlich and Tom Krause. Ameling is a welcome presence throughout the set which, for the most part, wears its years lightly.

Two symphonic reissues are well worth troubling over: Seiji Ozawa’s early-’90s set of late Dvořák with the Vienna Philharmonic especially, the Eight Symphony combining tonal warmth and impressive vitality, the New World well balanced and affectionately played. Also programmed are The Noon Witch, which is given memorably dramatic performance, and the concert overture In Nature’s Realm. I often feel that catalogue ubiquity has in the past rather worked against Ozawa, whose recorded output includes many gems, and the same might be said of Sir Neville Marriner. Take Marriner’s early digital CD of Haydn’s Morning, Noon, and Night symphonies, which is alert, refined, unostentatiously characterful and superbly played. Likewise, a collection of Baroque oboe concertos with Heinz Holliger as soloist, many again with the Academy taking part (also with I Musici): Bach, Telemann, Marcello, Sammartini, Albinoni and Cimarosa arranged into a concerto by Arthur Benjamin.

As to Gerard Souzay singing “Mélodies Françaises”, what praise can I offer that hasn’t already been more eloquently expressed elsewhere? Here is the finest French baritone post-Bernare and Panzéra in the song-cycles la bonne chanson (Fauré), Histoires naturelles (Ravel) and various “mini-cycles” by Poulenc. Souzay invariably sings most beautifully and his engagement with the various texts is a great source of joy while Dalton Baldwin provides near-ideal accompaniments.



John Boyer
American Record Guide, November 2010

we should be happy to have…this well-filled collection. Mr Souzay has nothing to prove here. The value of these performances was established long ago. It is simply for us to enjoy them.

To read the complete review, please visit American Record Guide online.



Michael Scott Rohan
BBC Music Magazine, September 2010

Performance
Recording

Bernac’s pupil and successor, Gérard Souzay, was a stronger, more rich-toned performer. Unfairly overshadowed by Fischer-Dieskau, his more fluent style is a benchmark for French mélodies.



Le Journal de Montréal, August 2010

Un des plus grands mélodistes du XXe siècle et certainement celui qui a donné aux mélodies françaises ses lettres de noblesse. En quatre disques et à prix plus que raisonnable, la poésie dans toute sa grandeur avec des œuvres de Ravel, Gounod, Duparc, Franck et surtout Gabriel Fauré. Une voix de baryton qui chante, soutenue par une lecture impeccable et vraiment sentie. Du grand art qui est tout sauf classique.






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