About this Recording
76051-2 - WORLD Rhythm 4 Kids: Sing-A-Long
English 

This Naxos World Rhythm 4 Kids sing-a-long CD helps develop sensitivity and acceptance of the musical, spiritual and religious practices of people around the world, while offering kids an experiential listen, learn and sing-a-long experience. We hope to create products that engage our youth and offer learning experiences. This collection seeks to expose children to the empowering message found in world music.

Rhythm 4 Kids is a company that believes children acquire self-worth through learned behavior, through experiences shared in the home, and at school. By obtaining a better understanding about the musical and artistic traditions of other cultures, children can learn to respect and cherish difference.

We want children to value their peers and elders as well as to gain acceptance of others, regardless of their religion, race or creed, to develop in children the desire and ability to communicate and learn about each other’s differences in a manner that is open, creative and constructive, and to foster in them an international awareness.

 

  1. Afrika Wassa (New Africa)
    Vieux Diop     5:49

    Country: Senegal
    Language: english/Wolof

    Senegal is a country in western Africa on the Atlantic coast. Senegal has a fascinating history that is preserved by storytellers called griots (pronounced gree-ohs). Centered in urban cities like Dakar, the capital city of Senegal, is a musical style called mbalax (pronounced mm-ballah). This style blends African, Caribbean and pop rhythms and is also known as the “jumping dance”. Vieux Diop (pronounced veea-jo) is a master of one of Africa’s most popular instruments, the kora, which has 21 strings and a gourd resonator and is plucked at a very fast speed. Formerly a member of the band of Senegal’s most famous singer, Youssou N’Dour, Diop has also played alongside the great percussionist Babatunde Olatunji. “Afrika Wassa (New Africa),” sung in both English and Wolof (one of several languages spoken in Senegal) is Diop’s attempt at fusing the two cultures for future generations, a practice he’s been engaged in since moving to the United States in 1984.

    Yayo Afrika Wassa Wassa Wassa Wassalele
    Yayo Afrika Wassalele Wassa Wassa Wassa Wassalele

    Yayo Afrika Yayo, Beyo Ndokalé
    Yayo Afrika Yayo, Beyo Ndokalé

    Gonna be a day, a brand new day, Ndokalé
    Gonna be day, we all will say, Wassa, Wassalele

    Yayo Afrika, say it with your heart,
    Wassa Wassa Wassa Wassalele

    Yayo Afrika, when are we gonna say,
    Wassa Wassa Wassa Wassalele

    Mama Afrika shed no tears, Yayo, Yayo
    Mama Afrika, don’t be scared, Yayo Yayo

    If there is a way we will find that way, Yayo, Yayo
    We will find that way when we all will say Wassa Wassalele

    Mama Afrika I say Jama Jáma
    Mama Afrika I always pray, Jama, Jama
    Senegal gonna say, Gambia say Wassalele,
    South Africa Wassalele
    Someday I am going to see Wassa Wassa Wassalele

    Say South Africa, this is a brand new day,
    this is a brand new day

    First Chorus:

    Yayo Yayo Afrika Wassa Wassa Wassa Wassalele
    Yayo Afriika Yayo Afrika

    Second Chorus:

    Mama Afrika I say Jama
    Mama Afrika I say Jama

    Ndokalé
    Jama Jáma Peace, Peace

  2. Koori Dreamtime
    Gary King Shenanigans     3:04

    Country: Australia
    Language: ENGLISH

    Australia is an island continent in the southern hemisphere, below Asia and north of Antarctica. It sits between the Pacific and Indian Oceans. Australia is best known for kangaroos, koala bears, boomerangs and Crocodile Dundee movies. The native people of Australia are called Aborigines (pronounced abba-rij-a-nees). They lived in Australia for thousands of years before the Europeans began settling there 300 years ago. The Aborigines’ Koori music has made a large impact in recent years. Koori music uses an instrument called the didgeridoo (pronounced dij-a-ree-doo), a hollowed-out tree branch that produces a “roar” when blown into. The “didge” was originally made by burying a wooden branch coated in clay into a termite nest! After some weeks the termites hollowed out the branch and formed a wooden pipe. "Koori Dreamtime" is sung by Gary King in English with some aboriginal animal names.

    Koori woman, Koori man,
    caring for the living land
    And if you love Australia true, you can be a Koori too
    And dance just like a kangaroo

    Koori woman, Koori man,
    caring for the living land
    And if you love Australia true, you can be a Koori too
    And dance just like a kangaroo
    And dance just like the brolgas do
    Koori woman, Koori man,
    caring for the living land
    And if you love Australia true, you can be a Koori too
    And dance just like a kangaroo
    And dance just like the brolgas do
    And fly like a wedge tail eagle

    Koori woman, Koori man,
    caring for the living land
    And if you love Australia true, you can be a Koori too
    And dance just like a kangaroo
    And dance just like the brolgas do
    And fly like a wedge tail eagle
    And dance just like a dingo too

    Koori woman, Koori man,
    caring for the living land
    And if you love Australia true, you can be a Koori too
    And dance just like a kangaroo
    And dance just like the brolgas do
    And fly like a wedge tail eagle
    And dance just like a dingo too
    Kookaburra up in the old gum tree

    Koori woman, Koori man,
    caring for the living land
    And if you love Australia true, you can be a Koori too
    And dance just like the animals do
    And dance just like the animals do
    And dance just like the animals do
    And dance just like the animals do

  3. Ma¯te mani audze¯dama
    Ilgi     2:52

    Country: Latvia
    Language: Latvian

    Latvia is a small country in Eastern Europe, slightly larger than the state of West Virginia. It borders the Baltic Sea, alongside the countries Estonia and Lithuania. Latvia has many native musical and cultural traditions despite centuries of occupation by other countries. Approximately 2.5 million people in Latvia are part of a long history that, according to local mythology, boasts the first Christmas tree, which was found in 1510 in Riga (the capital of Latvia). Traditional music is often based on Latvian history, and includes instruments like the kokle (a stringed instrument in a trapezoid shape), bagpipes, goat horn and fiddle. Very important in Latvian music is the daina (pronounced dye-na), a folk song originating from an ancient oral tradition, consisting of one or two non-rhyming stanzas. The five-piece Ilgi group formed in 1981 to preserve the folklore of their unique country. Their music is danceable one moment, quietly reflective the next. "Mate mani audzedama," from their 1998 album Saules Meita, is a tuneful introduction to the rich and inspiring Latvian culture.

    Ma¯te mani audze¯dama
    sola dieva de¯lin¸am

    kad uzaugu tad nedeva
    tad iedeva me¯nesˇam

    ko ma¯min¸a es darisˇu
    pie me¯nesˇa aizga¯jus

    me¯nestinis grozi¯ja¯si
    bri¯zˇam jaunis bri¯zˇam vecs
    English Translation
    When I was a little girl,
    Mother promised me,
    To a yonder star.

    When I became a woman,
    She did change her mind,
    Gave me away to the moon.

    Oh mother dearest, woe is me,
    What will become of me
    With the moon?

    The moon turns this way, the moon turns that way:
    The moon is young, and the moon is old.

  4. I Like to Eat
    Rafael Lorenzo and
    the Kid Pan Alley Band     3:55

    Country: USA
    Language: English

    The United States is rich in numerous folk traditions because its citizens represent every nation of the world. Folk musicians can be viewed as living newspapers of their societies, handing down stories for future generations. While Native American music is probably the oldest music in this country, English settlers introduced the concept of the troubadour—singers who spread folk songs far and wide—and today many folk musicians continue this tradition with an acoustic guitar and vocals. Paul Reisler founded the Kid Pan Alley Band in 1975, and they have performed more than 3,000 concerts, festivals and workshops, carrying on the troubadour tradition. “I Like to Eat,” sung by guitarist and banjo player Rafael Lorenzo, is a song with clever lyrics about a child who can’t wait until the end of the week when he or she can “get what I choose” to eat.

    Chorus:

    I like to eat pink pickled peppers on ice cream on Friday
    I like to eat purple pickle pasta on rye bread on my birthday

    On Monday, mamma makes me eyeball stew
    that tastes like old shoes
    Gives me the higgly diggly blues
    On Tuesday, cardboard eggplant and wormy meatloaf
    Oh, lord, it gives my stomach the black and blue blues
    How I long for Friday when I get what I choose!

    Repeat Chorus:

    And on Wednesday, she throws me brussel sprouts
    and tennis balls
    But I just shuck’ em off and go back into the hall
    On Thursday, it’s bright green spinach toilet paper
    Oh, lord, it gives my stomach the black and blue blues
    How I long for Friday when I get what I choose!

    Repeat Chorus 4 Times:

  5. Mordechai What a Guy?
    The Jews Brothers Band     5:02

    Country: New Zealand
    Language: english

    While New Zealand is traditionally known for its native Maori (pronounced mow-ree, the first syllable rhyming with cow) music, the recent revival of the Jewish music called Klezmer has touched countless countries. One group that has adopted the style is the Jews Brothers Band. Formed in 1994, they add celtic, jazz, and gypsy influences into their mostly Klezmer style. The earliest written appearance of Klezmer can be traced back to 15th century Europe, when large orchestras would play for weddings and court dances. A worldwide revival over the last half-century has resulted in the formation of numerous bands that consider Klezmer the most important music in modern Jewish life. Jazz has also played a big role in this revival, and Klezmer now boasts a variety of sounds in its distinctive, energetic performance. Keeping in line with tradition, “Mordechai What a Guy?,” sung in English and Hebrew, takes a humorous approach to telling the story of the Jewish people.

    Mordechai was a Benjamite
    Born in old Jerusalem
    He fought against the Persians
    But the Persians were too strong
    They wasted the city
    And when the Persians captured him
    Mordechai was carted off to Babylon
    He had a niece, she was an orphan
    So he raised her as his own
    He changed her name to Esther
    Because he had a dream
    That one day she would share the throne

    Chorus:

    Mordechai Mordechai What a guy!
    Mordechai Mordechai What a guy!
    Mordechai Mordechai What a guy!
    Mordechai Mordechai What a guy!

    The mighty king of Persia was Ahasverus
    He divorced his wife
    And so he needed a new bride
    And so they organized
    A national beauty contest
    Girls turned up from far and wide

    When Mordechai heard about the contest
    He said, “Esther you must do this
    Get an entry form,
    But when you meet the king,
    Never ever tell him that you're Jewish”

    Repeat Chorus:

    Now every contestant had one year's beauty treatment
    And one by one they went to see the king
    When it was Esther's turn
    The king was delighted
    She was the sweetest thing he'd ever seen

    He made Esther Queen of Persia
    And Mordechai's dream came true
    She always kept
    The promise to her uncle
    And nobody knew she was a Jew

    Repeat Chorus:

  6. Tái tia táiv
    Makám     3:39

    Country: Hungary
    Language: Hungarian

    Hungary is a fascinating country, with traditions owing to both East European and Asian influences. Budapest, the capital city, is split into two parts (Buda and Pest) by the Danube River. The national language, Magyar, as well as the country’s music, has more in common with Asia than Europe, even though Hungary is actually part of central Europe. The result has been a long line of jazz and folk traditions steeped in Middle Eastern, Turkish and Chinese composition. While very little of this interesting culture has been spread to other lands (Magyar (pronounced maw-dyar) is considered as hard to translate as Japanese), the upbeat music of the táncház (dance house) has been receiving international attention recently. The group, Makám, which mixes modern Hungarian sounds with ancient traditions and creative, more modern ideas from jazz, is a project dedicated to bringing different cultures together, as Hungary country has been doing for so long. “Tái tia táiv,” a cute tale about underwater life, is a great introduction to the swinging sounds of the dance house táncház.

    R: Buy a viz ala, ott lakik az aranyhalam,
    ezyusht pontyom, a kesegem,
    Kyosyon be hozza.

    Arra yart a Shipeky,
    Horgasbotya volt neki.
    Bedobta a horgot, kifogta a pontyot,
    Abbol fyoztyuk ma a vachorat.

    R: ...
    Arra yott Tot, hozott ed halot,
    Kifogta az aranyhalam,
    Abbol fyozunk ma vachorat.
    Yo mondya a sentenciat:

    R: ...
    Futva yott a Bon ish.
    Semtelen kish hod ish.
    Elkapta a kesegem,
    Ebbyol lett mar elegem

    Nem fyozunk ma vachorat.
    Nem akarok litaniat!

    English Translation
    Tái tia táiv - Under water, dive
    There's my goldfish and silver carp and my sea-bream
    Greet them nicely

    There comes Sipeki
    He had a fishing rod
    The rod is cast
    Caught is the carp
    That was our feast
    He said the toast.

    Tái tia táiv - Under water, dive
    There's my goldfish and my sea-bream
    Greet them nicely

    There comes Mr. Tóth
    A net he has brought
    He has caught my goldfish
    That is our feast
    He says the sentences

    Tái tia táiv - Under water, dive
    There's my little sea-bream
    Greet it nicely

    Lo! Bónis ran there
    He's a little beggar
    He's caught my sea-bream
    He's so cheeky
    We won't have a feast, oh not any
    I don't want any more litany.

    Tái tia táiv - Under water, dive
    There was my goldfish
    Silver carp and my sea-bream...

  7. The Rattlin’ Bog
    Golden Bough     4:22

    Country: Ireland
    Language: ENGLISH

    Ireland is an island located in the Atlantic Ocean, west of Great Britain. Ireland is known worldwide for its Celtic (pronounced kel-tick) music, which uses instruments like the bagpipe, harp, tin-whistle and fiddle. Before the 18th Century, Irish music fell into two categories: religious-based songs or folk songs about love and loss. Much Irish music has been handed down from one generation to the next and was rarely written down, so sometimes a single song had many different versions. Irish songs can be slow ballads for listening, or faster tunes called jigs or reels, for dancing. Today Irish folk music is beginning to use more electronic instruments, although the classical tradition still plays an important role in the culture. “The Rattlin’ Bog” is one of the oldest children’s folk songs known, and has been played worldwide due to its catchy lyrics and upbeat rhythm.

    Chorus:

    Oh, row, the Rattlin’ Bog, the bog down in the valley,
    Oh, row, the Rattlin’ Bog, the bog down in the valley-o,

    Repeat Chorus:

    In that bog there was a hole, a rare hole and a
    rattlin’ hole.

    The Hole in the bog and the hole in the bog,

    And the bog down in the valley –o.
    2. In that hole there was a tree…
    3. On that tree there was a bough…
    4. On that bough there was a branch…
    5. On that branch there was a nest...
    6. On that nest there was a bird...
    7. On that bird there was a tail…
    8. On that tail there was a feather…
    9. On that feather there was a flea…
    10. On that flea there was a leg…
    11. On that leg there was a hair…

  8. Shona Mona (My Loving Lights)
    Bapi Das Baul     5:33

    Country: India
    Language: Bengali

    India has one of the world’s oldest cultures. Located between Pakistan and China, the country extends well into the Indian Ocean. Folklore is important in the upbringing of children in the Indian culture. The country's main religion, Hinduism, is based on a belief that there are many different gods representing different emotions and periods of existence. According to Hindi thought, each child has a “mamma,” an uncle who opens the door to his or her dreams. “Shona Mona,” sung in both Hindi and English, is a tale about a mother lulling her child to sleep. Singer Bapi Das Baul creates a soft melody with his sweet lyrics.

    Chorus: Repeat 3x
    SHONARE MONARE SHONA MONA

    SHONARE MONARE SHONA MONA
    ADORER KONA AMAR GIBONER SHADONA
    SHONARE MONARE SHONA MONA
    TATA TATHOI TATHOI

    Repeat 2x
    SHONA MONA SHONA MONA
    SHONA MONA NACHE TATHOI TATHOI
    CHAD MAMA PETE CHAI
    HATIE NIYA MOI

    Repeat Chorus

    Repeat 2x

    SHONA MONA CHAI SATAR DITE
    NODI VORA DHAU
    >VOI PAYE NA TATE

    My love from infinite to small to infinite big
    The kingdom of my life
    Shona Mona dancing (ta-thoi ta-thoi)
    Want to catch the moon
    Want the ladder to climb there
    Shona Mona swimming
    Take care! It’s full of waves!
    No matter the waves
    Shona Mona playing ball
    Playing and Playing
    Rest of the world has disappeared

  9. El Gallo Pinto (The Painted Rooster)
    Claudia Gomez     4:22

    Country: Colombia
    Language: Spanish

    Singer Claudia Gomez is from the city of Medellín in Colombia, a country on the northwestern tip of South America. Colombia is known for its huge beaches and rainforests. Medellín (pronounced may-day-yeen), a large city of three million people, sits at the foot of the Andes Mountains in the central part of the country. Now a resident of San Francisco, Gomez fuses the classic styles of Cuban son (pronounced sone) music, Brazilian samba (pronounced som-ba) and Colombian cumbia (pronounced coom-bee-ya) with European folk, jazz and rock. Cumbia makes use of instruments such as the maraca (pronounced muh-rocka), tambora and gaita (pronounced gah-ee-tah). Gomez has performed all over the world at numerous music festivals and has received critical acclaim for her soft, gentle vocals, quickly apparent on her Spanish- language contribution to this collection.

    El gallo pinto no pinta
    El que pinta es el pintor
    Que al gallo pinto las pintas
    Pinta por pinta pinto

    English Translation
    The painted rooster doesn’t paint
    The one who paints is the painter
    The spotted rooster’s spots
    Spot by spot were painted

  10. The Banana Boat Song
    Cedella Marley-Booker with Taj Mahal     5:33

    Country: Jamaica
    Language: English

    Jamaica will forever be known as the birthplace of reggae music, and who better to represent the much-loved Caribbean island than the mother of Bob Marley, the greatest reggae artist of all? Here, Cedella Marley-Booker performs her version of a fun song that once introduced the world to another Caribbean musical style, called calypso (pronounced ka-lip-so). Booker joins American blues legend Taj Mahal, and together they give new life to this song dedicated to working people. Since it first came into being, calypso has provided a method for residents of the villages of Trinidad to inform each other of recent events and to comment on them. The music still plays an important role in the country’s annual Carnival festival. While all calypso was originally sung in the Caribbean patois (pronounced pat-wah), a broken form of French, the fusion with English has given the language a unique, instantly recognizable ring. Recorded by hundreds of artists, it is best known from the 1957 version by American folk singer Harry Belafonte, whose parents were of Caribbean origin.

    Day-O me say day-o
    Daylight come and me wan’ go home
    Day-me say, day-missa, day-missa, day-missa, day-missa, day-o
    Daylight come and me wanna go home.

    Work all night ’til the mornin’ come
    Daylight come and me wanna go home
    Stack banana ’til the mornin’ come
    Daylight come and me wanna go home.

    Come Mister Tally Man, Tally de banana
    Daylight come and me wanna go home
    Come Mister Tally Man, Tally de banana
    Daylight come and me wanna go home
    Six hand, seven hand, eight foot bunch
    Daylight come and me wanna go home.
    Six hand, seven hand, eight foot bunch
    Daylight come and me wanna go home.

    Chorus:

    Sing me day-o, day-o
    Daylight come and me wanna go home
    I sing day-o, day-o
    Daylight come and me wanna go home.

    A beautiful bunch of ripe banana
    Daylight come and me wanna go home
    Say in there hid the deadly black tarantula
    Daylight come and me wanna go home.

    Six hand, seven hand, eight foot bunch
    Daylight come and me wanna go home.

    Chorus:

    Day-o, day-o Daylight come and me wanna go home
    Day-o, day-o Daylight come and me wanna go home.

    Repeat

  11. ALL SPIRITS sing
    Joanne Shenandoah     4:22

    Country: USA (native america)
    Language: Iroquois/ENGLISH

    Joanne Shenandoah is one of the few singers successfully blending Native American traditional songs with pop music, touching audiences worldwide. She performed at both presidential inaugurations for Bill Clinton, has been nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in music, and recorded for numerous films and television stations, including PBS. She is a native Iroquois (pronounced iru-kwoy) of the Oneida (pronounced oh-nye-duh) Nation, given the Indian name Takalihwa Kwha (which means “She Sings”). “All Spirits Sing” is a rousing, beautiful testament to the poetic nature of her people, as well as the entire community of humans the Great Spirit, the Iroquois name for God, touches. According to her, this song is “a mythical journey that all ages can relate to, a tale to raise children’s self-esteem.”

    Chorus:

    Hi yo hi yo hi ee yo hi yah
    Hi yo hi ee yo hi yah
    Hi yo hi ee yo hi yah
    Way yah hay yah
    Way yah hay yah yo way

    A long time ago I was afraid of the dark
    I took a long look down deep in my heart
    All my fears were inside because I didn’t know
    There’s a light shining for you wherever you go…

    Chorus:

    Everytime you hear a river run by…
    Everytime you see a bird when she flies…
    There’s a song in the air a whisper in the wind…
    I believe in their power All Spirits sing….

    I believe…I believe…
    There’s a spirit shining on us…
    I believe…I believe
    It must be love…
    I believe…believe…
    There’s a spirit guiding our every move…
    I believe in a spirit…in a spirit…called love…

  12. Pizzica Tarantata
    Alessandra Belloni     7:51

    Country: Italy
    Language: Italian

    Alessandra Belloni, sometimes called the “Mediterranean Volcano” because of her fiery and exciting music, is a world-famous percussionist who has introduced her native southern Italian folk music to the world. Belloni is a singer, tambourine master, dancer and actress. She has also encouraged many Italian-Americans to explore their ethnic heritage through workshops, festivals and performances. Italy—the boot-shaped country that lies south of France and Switzerland—has long been a crossroads between Greece and Turkey, drawing in influences from East and West. This song is about the taratella, a dance that is so fast and exciting it is as if the performers were bitten by a dangerous spider called the tarantula.

    Ti rol lala Ti rol lala nana nana nana
    Jammo picciriddi jammo a ballari
    Oi ninini oi ninini nana nana nana

    Ti prego Santo Paulo falla guariri
    Che l’ave piizzicata a taratella

    Addo ta pizzicao a Tarantella,
    Sotta lu giru giru di la vunnella

    Oh come balli bene a tarantella
    ballamu e zumpamu a tarantella

    Addo t'a pizzicao a tarantella sotto a la putarria
    di la camisaCI e' taranta lassala ballari

    Ci e' malinconia cacciala fora

    Nana nana na beddu e’ l’amuri e ci lo sapi fa

     

    English Translation

    Ti rol lala Ti rol lala nana nana nana
    Ti rol lala Ti rol lala nana nana nana

    Let's go kids, let's go dance!

    Please St Paul heal her,
    She has been bitten by the tarantula.
    Where did the tarantula bite you?
    It bit me on the ankles.

    You dance the tarantella so well,
    Let's dance the tarantella,
    Let's dance and jump around.

    Where did the tarantula bite you?
    She bit me under the shirt.
    If it is a tarantula that bit you
    Let's dance and if it is
    Sadness you feel
    The dance will send the pain of the bite away.

    Love is beautiful!

  13. NENE
    Amina     2:16

    Country: Tunisia
    Language: Arabic

    Located at the tip of northern Africa between Libya and Algeria, Tunisia is rich in cultural activities, sponsoring numerous music and arts festivals throughout the year. Inspired by the women in her family [her mother was a singer and her grandmother played the oud (pronounced ood)], Amina Annabi began a musical career after moving to France at age 12. She was the first Arabic native to represent France in the famous Eurovision Song Contest in 1991, where she won first place. She has since been crossing musical boundaries between the Middle East and Europe. A popular actress as well as singer, she has spent time in both artistic areas, and has worked with several other such famed musicians. Sung in her native Arabic, “Nene” is a global lullaby to end this worldly collection.

    Nene, nene, nene mahle mnemek
    enness ya oueldi, enness ya benti
    leila saida ,omek tranni koul lila
    sout omek i ranni
    Nene nene nene ....

    English Translation
    Sleep, sleep..
    Sleep well, your mother is going to sing
    for you every night
    This night is going to be magic, don't worry.
    The voice of your mother will always sing
    Your name is so beautiful my daughter
    Your name is so beautiful my son
    You can sleep well, your essence is so blessed
    Sleep, Sleep, Sleep…
    “Now darling you can sleep with love” Amina

 

"Afrika Wassa"
Performed by: Vieux Diop.
Composed by: Vieux Diop/Brian Keane. Publishing administered by: Triloka Records, www.troika.com.
Master recording under license from
Triloka Records.
From the album: Afrika Wassa (82019-2)
C & P 2000 Triloka Records

"Koori Dreamtime"
Performed by: Shenanigans.
Composed by: Gary King.
Published by: Gary King (APRA).
Master recording under license from
Rhyme & Reason,
admin. by Australian Music Marketing Abroad.
From the album: Dance Like a Kangaroo
C 1989 Gary King /APRA
P 1989 Rhyme & Reason, admin. by
Australian Music Marketing Abroad

"Mate Mani Audzedama"
Performed by: Ilgi.
Traditional Latvian composition.
Master recording under license from
UPE Records, Ltd.
C & P 1998 UPE Records

"I Like to Eat"
Performed by: Rafael Lorenzo and
the Kid Pan Alley Band.
Composed by: Paul Reisler/Mrs. Vickers's 4th grade class of Rappahannock Elem. School.
Published by: Zoidsongs (ASCAP).
Master recording under license from
Kid Pan Alley™ Records, www.kidpanalley.org.
From the album: Tidal Wave of Song. An initiative of Ki Theatre, a 501 C 3 non-profit organization, and the entire Rappahannock Co., VA
C 2000 Zoidsongs / ASCAP
P 2000 Kid Pan Alley Records
"Mordechai (What a Guy!)"
Performed by: The Jews Brothers Band. Composed by: Arif Usmani (APRA), Composed for a Purim Concert in New Zealand.
Published by: Arif Usmani / APRA.
Master recording under license from
Rouge Records, Ltd., www.rouge.co.nz.
C 1996 Arif Usmani / APRA.
P 1996 Rouge Records, Ltd.

"Tái Tia Táiv"
Performed by: Makam.
Composed by: Makam/Krulik Zoltan.
Translation by: Gabor Erddi.
Publishing Admin.: Fono Records.
Master recording under license from
Fono Records, Ltd. www.fonorecords.hu.
From the album: Sindbad.
C&P 2000 Fono Records, Ltd.

"The Rattlin' Bog"
Performed by: Golden Bough with special guests Richard Ferry, Children's Choir.
Traditional Irish composition.
Original arrangement by:
Paul Espinoza/Margie Butler/Florie Brown.
Published by: ARC Music International, Ltd. (PRS-MCPS).
Master recording under license from ARC Music International, Ltd., www.arcmusic.co.uk.
From the album: Celtic Songs for Children: Kids at Heart.
C & P 1986 ARC Music International, Ltd./PRS-MCPS

"Shona Mona"
Performed by: Bapi Das Baul.
Composed by: Bapi Das Baul.
Published by: Bapi Das Baul.
Master recording under license from
Bapi Das Baul.
C & P 2003 Bapi Das Baul

"El Gallo Pinto"
Performed by: Claudia Gomez.
Composed by: Claudia Gomez.
Published by: Claudia Gomez.
Master recording under license from
Music For Little People.
From the album: Fiesta Musical.
C 1994 Claudia Gomez.
P 1994 Music For Little People ~ www.mflp.com

"Banana Boat Song (Day-O)"
Performed by: Cedella Marley-Booker with Taj Mahal.
Composed by: Irving Burgie (ASCAP)/William Attaway (ASCAP).
Published by: Lord Burgess Music Publishing and Cherry Lane Music Publishing (ASCAP). Master recording under license from
Music For Little People.
From the album: Smilin' Island of Song.
C 1955, 1983 Lord Burgess Music Publishing, Cherry Lane Music Publishing / ASCAP.
P 1992 Music For Little People ~ www.mflp.com

"All Spirits Sing".
Performed by: Joanne Shenandoah.
Composed by: Joanne Shenandoah.
Published by: Joanne Shenandoah.
Master recording under license from
Music For Little People.
From the album: Joanne Shenandoah
C 1997 Joanne Shenandoah
P 1997 Music For Little People ~ www.mflp.com

"Pizzica Tarantata"
Performed by: Alessandra Belloni.
Traditional Italian composition,
Original arrangement by: Alessandra Belloni (ASCAP)/John La Barbera (ASCAP).
Published by: I Giullardi Di Piazza, Inc. (ASCAP)
Master recording courtesy of Naxos World,
a subsidiary of HNH International, Ltd., www.naxos.com.
From the album: Tarantelle & Canti d'Amore: The Songs of Alessandra Belloni (76049-2)
C 2003 I Giullardi Di Piazza, Inc. / ASCAP.
P 2003 Naxos of America, Inc., HNH International, Ltd.

"Nene"
Performed by: Amina Annabi Laurence. Composed by: Amina Annabi Laurence. Published by: Dawn Elder Entertainment (SECEM).
Master recording under license from
Dawn Elder Management, 303 Loma Alta Dr., Suite 31. Santa Barbara, CA 805.963.2415 / 805.963.1973 (fax) demgmt@aol.com
C & P 2003 Dawn Elder Entertainment / SECEM

As the producer of Naxos World Rhythm 4 Kids sing-a-long CD I would like to dedicate this project to the children of the world who are denied the right of literacy and song as well as to all of the underpaid teachers who strive to teach the beauty and importance of cultural difference. Much honor and deep thanks to my mother, Sheila Cohen, for being the inspiration in my life to achieve success through acts of humanity and compassion, to my best friend Key for continuing to support my intellectual journeys, to the staff at Global Rhythm magazine for their time, and to Dolores Canavan for her support and patience during the entire course of this project.

Alecia Cohen


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