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BRUCKNER, A.: Symphony No. 8 (original 1887 version, ed. L. Nowak) / Symphony No. 0, "Nullte" (Ireland National Symphony, Tintner)


Naxos 8.554215-16

   Penguin Guide, January 2009
   New Straits Times (Malaysia), October 2001
   Sensible Sound, July 2001
   MusicWeb International, June 2000
   Gramophone, February 1999
   Pizzicato, January 1999
   Soundscapes, January 1999
   Kulturspeilet, January 1999
   The Globe and Mail, December 1998
   BBC Music Magazine, December 1998
   Hi-Fi News & Record Review, December 1998
   The Orange County Register, November 1998
   Classic FM, November 1998
   Fanfare, November 1998
   Classic CD, November 1998
   The Orange County Register, September 1998
   The Times (London), September 1998
   Amazon.com
   Le Discophile Virtuel
   Tower.com

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Penguin Guide, January 2009

In a moving note Georg Tintner passionately argues the case for Bruckner’s original (1887) version of No. 8, fresh and spontaneous. The result is an intense, keenly concentrated reading, with total dedication in the playing which rises to supreme heights in the long Adagio slow movement, where the refined pianissimo playing of the Irish orchestra is magically caught by the Naxos engineers. Even for those with rival versions, this makes a very necessary recommendation, particularly when the two-disc package brings so generous and revealing a coupling as the D minor Symphonie (Die Hullte) in a very good performance. Tintner powerfully brings out the Brucknerian qualities in embryo, and again he is served very well by the Irish orchestra.



Edward Dorall,
New Straits Times (Malaysia), October 2001

"NAXOS was fortunate to have had Georg Tintner record the complete cycle of Bruckner's symphonies for its increasingly prestigious CD company.

This is actually Bruckner's second symphony, withdrawn by the composer in dismay and numbered as O when its first conductor couldn't identify the opening movement's first subject. Today, despite some gauche themes and passages, it is considered by most Brucknerites to be a more advanced composition than Symphony No. 1 as well as the archetype of the Bruckner symphony, varied eight times (16 if we consider revisions) in Symphonies 2 to 9.

Tintner's first movement, after a jaunty start, dramatically contrasts its lovely quiet segments with formidable fortissimi. His second, taken at a sensible leisurely pace, makes its relaxed but not always equally compelling material sound ethereal, even gripping. A good pounding Scherzo with its rich, smooth Trio and a sturdy Finale, daringly contrasting a dynamic first and lilting second subject, conclude a great performance of a considerable work."



Sensible Sound, July 2001

"I still would recommend this budget-priced Naxos CD. Why? Because of the "O" Symphony that fills out this double CD. The Naxos is a CD that I plan to keep in my collection because of the brilliantly conducted and played "O" Symphony."



Terry Barfoot
MusicWeb International, June 2000

To record the complete Bruckner symphonies is a major undertaking, not to be taken lightly by any of those involved: conductor, orchestra, recording engineers, record company. Therefore it needs to be said at the outset that Naxos has achieved a triumph, nothing less. The only tragedy is that the conductor, Georg Tintner, is no longer alive to witness its full acknowledgement.

Tintner (born 1917), like so many musicians, fled his native Austria before the Nazi threat and made a worthwhile but largely unnoticed career in Australasia, Canada and, occasionally, Europe. These recordings, dating from 1995-98, brought him a recognition that was long overdue. For Tintner’s love and understanding of Bruckner are beyond question. Tempi, phrasing and architecture always feel right, and the structural control of each of the symphonies is never less than assured.

The Symphony no. 0, another piece published only after the composer’s death, is coupled with the Eighth (see below). While the Irish orchestra cannot match the richness of tone of their Scottish (and yet more celebrated) counterparts, this remains a hugely enjoyable recording, and a tribute to Tintner’s skill in preparing the performance, since this orchestra can hardly have played the music many times, if at all, before 1996 when the recording was made. ‘Die Nullte’, as it is known, is altogether more characteristic than the ‘Study Symphony’, and as such is fully deserving of a place in the Bruckner canon; it is by no means a mere curiosity. The magnificent sweep of the opening phase is proof enough of that.

As far as the vexed question of editions is concerned, it is a cause of some regret that Tintner only recorded the first (1887), rather than the revised (1890) version of the Eighth Symphony. It is far too easy a generalisation to suggest that Bruckner’s first thoughts were always best, and in this, surely his greatest symphony, it is the revised version which is generally played and which is certainly superior. Surely Tintner would have gone on to record it had fate decreed him the chance. As it stands the Eighth that is available here is best judged as an interesting performance of an interesting piece, beautifully played by the Scottish National Orchestra and given a rare opportunity to be widely heard.



Robert Layton
Gramophone, February 1999

QUARTERLY RETROSPECT

Richard Osborne recommended Georg Tintner, an echt-Brucknerian if ever there was one, an intuitive and selfless interpreter…  collectors who have the Karajan, Jochum or Wand should consider supplementing their libraries with the present issue. © 1999 Gramophone



Remy Franck
Pizzicato, January 1999

TINTNER’s PHENOMENAL BRUCKNER

My God, how beautiful! … Georg Tintner, the great unknown, who has suddenly reported back in from distant countries, who demonstrates that we were all mistaken when we said the the breed of great conductors died with Solti. Tintner was there, but he hid himself away. Now he has the opportunity with Naxos to build a monument not only for himself but primarily for music and of course for Bruckner. For the complete set of these recordings could become one of the best ever made. Exceptional, masterly performance. A must! © 1999 Pizzicato


Deryk Barker
Soundscapes, January 1999

…in his lucid and enlightening liner note (would that other conductors did likewise)… With this new recording Georg Tintner confirms his position as one of the greatest of living Bruckner conductors. … such is Tintner’s command of the idiom and control of the overall form and structure that even one’s momentary astonishment is rapidly swept away by the majesty of his overall conception of the work. … Like the piece itself, Tintner’s performance grows in stature as it proceeds. …With a sure hand, he shapes [the Adagio’s] half-hour extent magnificently, with each climax carefully judged and the dynamics beautifully molded… Tintner yields to none in his architectural feel for the [final] movement (and the work as a whole), yet there is no lack of detail nor excitement. … This set is an essential purchase for any lover of Bruckner’s music. © 1999 Soundscapes



Kjell Moe
Kulturspeilet, January 1999

And instead of the great name orchestras and star conductors it is the Irish National SO under unknown Georg Tintner who deliver this sensation… We do not hesitate proclaiming this without a doubt one of this year’s great releases in the CD market… The enthusiasm in the playing and the understanding of Bruckner’s music that the orchestra’s version of No. 8 reaches an exalted position in the ranking. Well ahead of many more important names and orchestras… These are golden times for all Bruckner fans. Go out and get Bruckner with the Irish National Symphony Orchestra!” © 1999 Kulturspeilet



David Lasker
The Globe and Mail, December 1998

Nova Scotia’s Georg Tintner and the National Symphony of Ireland find the right tempo, tone colour and acoustic for these towering symphonic edifices. © 1998 The Globe and Mail




Robert Layton
BBC Music Magazine, December 1998

…as earlier issues in his cycle have shown, Georg Tintner is totally dedicated: he gives you Bruckner pure and true with no ponderous frills. © 1998 BBC Music Magazine



Peter Branscombe
Hi-Fi News & Record Review, December 1998

No one will regret the modest outlay for this fine issue; it should make new disciples for Bruckner. © 1998 Hi-Fi News & Record Review



Timothy Mangan
The Orange County Register, November 1998

GREAT GIVING (annual gift guide)

Inside info: George Tintner leads the National Orchestra of Ireland in terrific performances of Bruckner’s Symphonies No. 8 and (the rarely heard) No. 0 on Naxos. © 1998 The Orange County Register


Robert Layton
Classic FM, November 1998

Though the National Symphony Orchestra of Ireland do not match the Los Angeles [Philharmonic] players in tonal lustre, I am not so sure whether their accounts of Bruckner’s Eighth Symphony and the early D minor Die Nullte (No. 0) under the veteran Georg Tintner won’t prove in the end more satisfying artistically… the performance casts an immediate spell. © 1998 Classic FM



Robert McColley
Fanfare, November 1998

Here is more great Bruckner from the superb combination of Georg Tintner (b. 1917) and the Irish National Symphony Orchestra of Dublin… we have playing of extraordinary intensity and expressiveness. … Tintner and the Irish orchestra play [Symphony No. 0] with the same flair and dedication displayed in the longer and more profound Second and Eighth. © 1998 Fanfare



Michael Jameson
Classic CD, November 1998

Tintner secures massive response from the National Symphony Orchestra of Ireland, who acquit themselves eloquently throughout this impressively sustained performance… no dedicated Brucknerian should be without this recording of this 1887 Nowak edition … this is certainly another major coup for Klaus Heymann’s budget label, and still more desirable for the intelligent, capably played new version of Symphony No. 0. © 1998 Classic CD



Timothy Mangan
The Orange County Register, September 1998

An engrossing cycle of the complete symphonies is underway on Naxos … Tintner, who now resides in Canada, is a find… He’s wonderfully into it, into the Brucknerian grandiosity, into the magical hush, into the religiosity of feeling… He even writes the well-informed program notes. © 1998 The Orange County Register



Barry Millington
The Times (London), September 1998

… now that Naxos has given him a Bruckner cycle that [Tintner] is becoming talked about in this country too. Deservedly so, for his Bruckner series is interpretatively in the first league… Majestic, surely paced conducting… his own highly informative notes. © 1998 The Times (London)



Jed Distler
Amazon.com

Tintner proves just as clear-headed and loving a Brucknerian from the vantagepoint of the podium… anyone who cares about Bruckner should not pass up this illuminating release. © Amazon.com



Le Discophile Virtuel

“[Tintner] obtains a success certainly more complete than the mediocre version of Inbal (Teldec) and shows with fervour the superiority of the final version… The Irish orchestra, certainly not very familiar with the repertory, plays as if its life depended on it and the result of its effort is marvellous. © Le Discophile Virtuel



Tower.com

Georg Tintner couples a blazing performance of the Symphony… No. 0 with a rare performance of the original 1887 version of the mighty Symphony No. 8… The octogenarian Tintner has devoted his entire performing career to the music of Bruckner. Here he provides glowing performances at a budget price. © Tower.com





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