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John Bell Young
Fanfare, July 2015

LYATOSHYNSKY, B.: Symphonies, Vol. 1 - No. 1 / Grazhyna (Ukrainian State Symphony, Kuchar) 8.555578
LYATOSHYNSKY, B.: Symphonies, Vol. 2 - Nos. 2 and 3 (Ukrainian State Symphony, Kuchar) 8.555579
LYATOSHYNSKY, B.: Symphonies, Vol. 3 - Nos. 4 and 5 (Ukrainian State Symphony, Kuchar) 8.555580

Theodore Kuchar is a conductor of unimpeachable credentials, and unimpeachable music-making as well. He serves this repertoire to perfection with the exquisitely polished Ukrainian State Symphony Orchestra, an ensemble so deftly at one with its leader… I would very much like to hear more of this composer… © 2015 Fanfare Read complete review



Michael Cookson
MusicWeb International, February 2015

LYATOSHYNSKY, B.: Symphonies, Vol. 1 - No. 1 / Grazhyna (Ukrainian State Symphony, Kuchar) 8.555578
LYATOSHYNSKY, B.: Symphonies, Vol. 2 - Nos. 2 and 3 (Ukrainian State Symphony, Kuchar) 8.555579
LYATOSHYNSKY, B.: Symphonies, Vol. 3 - Nos. 4 and 5 (Ukrainian State Symphony, Kuchar) 8.555580

Throughout these discs the excellent and well prepared orchestra under Kuchar gives powerfully expressive performances that are often gripping and always compelling. No problems whatsoever with the clear and well balanced recorded sound.

The symphonies of Boris Lyatoshynsky are certainly well worth getting to know. Those wanting to try something away from the mainstream and admirers of Slavic symphonies will be in their element. © 2015 MusicWeb International Read complete review



Robert E. Benson
ClassicalCDReview.com, February 2015

LYATOSHYNSKY, B.: Symphonies, Vol. 1 - No. 1 / Grazhyna (Ukrainian State Symphony, Kuchar) 8.555578
LYATOSHYNSKY, B.: Symphonies, Vol. 2 - Nos. 2 and 3 (Ukrainian State Symphony, Kuchar) 8.555579
LYATOSHYNSKY, B.: Symphonies, Vol. 3 - Nos. 4 and 5 (Ukrainian State Symphony, Kuchar) 8.555580

Lyatoshynsky’s orhestration is rich, filled with harps, gentle woodwind solos and strong brass statements. It is amazing that all of this music, particularly the last three symphonies, isn’t played and recorded more often. And there are many other works by Lyatoshynsky yet to receive their first recording, including overtures, suites and film music. In the meantime, check out these superb and very important [discs]. © 2015 ClassicalCDReview.com Read complete review




Erik Levi
BBC Music Magazine, January 2015

Boris Lyatoshinsky is widely regarded as the leading Ukranian symphonist of the 20th century. His First Symphony is a passionately Romantic work strongly influenced by Glière and Scriabin. © 2015 BBC Music Magazine



David Barker
MusicWeb International, December 2014

LYATOSHYNSKY, B.: Symphonies, Vol. 1 - No. 1 / Grazhyna (Ukrainian State Symphony, Kuchar) 8.555578
LYATOSHYNSKY, B.: Symphonies, Vol. 2 - Nos. 2 and 3 (Ukrainian State Symphony, Kuchar) 8.555579
LYATOSHYNSKY, B.: Symphonies, Vol. 3 - Nos. 4 and 5 (Ukrainian State Symphony, Kuchar) 8.555580

Theodore Kuchar was one of the Naxos stable’s most regular conductors, and the Ukrainian orchestra seems to one of the better Eastern European ensembles used by Naxos in that period. The sound quality is perfectly serviceable, in fact, better than the average orchestral recording from Marco Polo from that era. © 2014 MusicWeb International Read complete review



Robert Cummings
Classical Net, December 2014

LYATOSHYNSKY, B.: Symphonies, Vol. 1 - No. 1 / Grazhyna (Ukrainian State Symphony, Kuchar) 8.555578
LYATOSHYNSKY, B.: Symphonies, Vol. 2 - Nos. 2 and 3 (Ukrainian State Symphony, Kuchar) 8.555579
LYATOSHYNSKY, B.: Symphonies, Vol. 3 - Nos. 4 and 5 (Ukrainian State Symphony, Kuchar) 8.555580

…the performances by the Ukrainian State Symphony Orchestra under Theodore Kuchar are excellent and fully committed…

Originally recorded in 1993 and 1994, these performances are presented in good sonics, just about as vivid and powerful as those of more recent vintage.

While Lyatoshynsky displays some Russian and Slavic characteristics, he sounds cosmopolitan much of the time and displays a certain dynamism in his style—that is, he usually captures your attention with his distinctive musical persona and very assured orchestration. In sum, these discs present worthwhile, mostly distinctive music in fine performances and good sound that will be of interest to admirers of early 20th-century classical music. © 2014 Classical Net Read complete review



David Denton
David's Review Corner, November 2014

Born in 1895, Boris Lyatoshynsky became the father figure of 20th century Ukrainian music, his own works forming a bridge with the late Romantic era. He had been a pupil of Gliere, his mentor’s adoration of lush orchestral textures colouring his young pupil’s First Symphony. Completed in 1919. it was, to all intents and purposes, an extension on Gliere’s Third Symphony with the addition of the more exotic elements of Scriabin. Grand gestures fill the opening movement that is replete with likeable thematic material, the percussion and brass departments kept busy. The second movement—which was performed in advance of the work’s completion—is pure Gliere in its slow, warm and sensual progress. Had it been composed thirty years later the third, and last movement, could well have served as an epic Hollywood film score, its brilliant orchestral colours daubed on the music’s canvas as the work reaches its noisy conclusion. Thirty-six years later, and in much the same style, Grazhyna relates the story of a female worrier leading her Lithuanian troops fighting for their freedom, and as it came so soon after the death of the Soviet tyrant, Stalin, its impassioned message is clear, while her death comes as a Mahlerian march. Like the symphony, it ymakes demands on both the virtuosity and stamina of the orchestra, the big battle scene as violent as any you will hear. Both works call upon the strength and technical capability of the Ukrainian Symphon, an orchestra galvanised by their conductor, Theodore Kuchar, who took them into the recording studio to make a series of highly acclaimed releases. This Lyatoshynsky series was high amongst them, the original 1994 Marco Polo release having the requisite punchy sound. © 2014 David’s Review Corner



Jean-Yves Duperron
Classical Music Sentinel, November 2014

LYATOSHYNSKY, B.: Symphonies, Vol. 1 - No. 1 / Grazhyna (Ukrainian State Symphony, Kuchar) 8.555578
LYATOSHYNSKY, B.: Symphonies, Vol. 2 - Nos. 2 and 3 (Ukrainian State Symphony, Kuchar) 8.555579
LYATOSHYNSKY, B.: Symphonies, Vol. 3 - Nos. 4 and 5 (Ukrainian State Symphony, Kuchar) 8.555580

There are long passages in all five of these symphonies that will quite simply take your breath away and pin you to your seat.

American conductor Theodore Kuchar has released many fine recordings over the years on various labels, and seems to have championed Russian composers in particular…therefore this cycle of all the Symphonies of Boris Lyatoshynsky is no exception. He reads the composer’s mind by providing forceful accounts of the heavier aspects of these works and highlighting their wide orchestral colors, while maintaining a clear and constant eye on the symphonic thread that runs through them. © 2014 Classical Music Sentinel Read complete review





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