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Ronald E. Grames
Fanfare, May 2016

…[disc] makes a good budget recommendation. The ensemble plays with sweep and rich sonority, seemingly more concerned with line and blend than precision for precision sake, and is well recorded within a supportive acoustic. © 2016 Fanfare Read complete review



Pwyll ap SiƓn
Gramophone, February 2016

The Carducci’s performance is imbued with a grainy, almost greyscale patina. In ‘Excellent Mr Renfield’ and ‘Women in White’, moments of eerie anticipation are punctuated by dramatic outbursts. The quartet is joined by Cian O’Dúill (viola) and Gemma Rosefield (cello) for the string sextet arrangement of Glass’s Symphony No 3. Written originally for a 19-piece string orchestra, the Third lends itself well to a chamber setting. There are a few moments when the lines split to one-to-part, but what is lost in weight and depth is more than made up in clarity, focus and forward momentum. © 2016 Gramophone Read complete review on Gramophone



Rob Haskins
American Record Guide, January 2016

…here, at last, is what I’ve awaited. [Carduccis’] performance of the sextet is, hands down, much better than the one with the Glass Chamber Players on Orange Mountain; in fact, I can’t imagine one that could be better. As I think this is one of Glass’s best later compositions, this release warrants immediate purchase. To this there are also just as luminous performances of the Fifth Quartet and a suite from the Dracula score—the latter, again, infinitely more vibrant and passionate than Kronos’s tepid account. © 2016 American Record Guide Read complete review on American Record Guide



Chris Morgan
Scene Magazine, November 2015

In past compositions, the venerable form gave Glass an opportunity to develop his distinctive minimalist style. String Quartet No. 5, however, is an evolution of that method, delivering emotional gravitas and fragility with elevated technique. © 2015 Scene Magazine Read complete review



Infodad.com, September 2015

…fine performance…from the Carducci String Quartet. © 2015 Infodad.com Read complete review



Ettore Garzia
Percorsi Musicali, September 2015

The fifth string quartet by Philip Glass, which he wrote in 1991, has a more varied configuration than the previous quartets; with a fatalistic impression, typical of post-modern music, “String Quartet No. 5” flies away lightly and subtly harmonic and represents a good rescue from the minimalist stigmata (Haydn peeks out only in the fourth movement). This composition, in a sense, reflects on the problems that the American composer had faced to find the right solution between minimalistic techniques and the aesthetic reflection of tonality. The musical compromise is a delight to our ears, a brilliant representation of the decadence of our times and of its signals of impotence. © 2015 Percorsi Musicali



David Denton
David's Review Corner, September 2015

Having already recorded the first four, the young Carducci Quartet add Philip Glass’s Fifth String Quartet, his most substantial and recent work in the genre. Using a traditional structure he positions the whole score within the realms of tonality, turning the clock back to melodic inclinations. He does, of course, remain true to his place as a Minimalist composer—though he does not like being described as such—and here he does move outside of those confines, the very opening taking us into the world of the 20th century school of Romantic composers. The second movement is a very naughty scherzo, the finale playing around with sonorities to create the illusion of a huge spinning-wheel. That I find the whole score both fascinating and attractive, comes in no little measure from this magnificent performance, where the shaping of the repetitious patterns is so subtle. Since the score was completed in 1991, Glass has returned to that format in his 1998 score for the film Dracula. Wishing to stay well away from the usual creepy sounds we find in horror films, he retains that inner chill by the sparseness of the writing. From the original he created a Suite in eight sections, most being of short duration, the multi-coloured result becoming a fascinating experiment in sonorities. The disc is completed with Michael Riseman’s adaptation of the Third Symphony that was originally composed for a string ensemble. When helped by the very close-up recording, the Carducci give a performance that almost carries the weight of a chamber orchestra. Glass could not hope for finer performances than the disc offers. © 2015 David’s Review Corner





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