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Jerobear
Review Corner, November 2016

We’ve been enjoying this dramatic double CD of music, a romp written in the style of a classical symphony.

Domínguez is one of most sought-after Chilean conductors, conducting opera, ballet and symphony, and for ten years has been resident director of the Santiago Philharmonic Orchestra (who play on this CD).

Domínguez wanted the music to make sense even without the story and it does, a sweeping collection of tracks that goes from the romantic to the stirringly adventurous. It’s excellent and accessible, and whether you like film scores or more serious symphonies, you’re pretty well guaranteed to like it. © 2016 Review Corner Read complete review



JMC
The Chronicle, November 2016

Domínguez wanted the music to make sense even without the story and it does, a sweeping collection of tracks that goes from the romantic to the stirringly adventurous. It’s excellent and accessible, and whether you like film scores or more serious symphonies, you’re pretty well guaranteed to like it. © 2016 The Chronicle



Elliot Fisch
American Record Guide, November 2016

This is all very colorful and the music fits the scenario. The music is far more inventive than the story. There is cinematic sweep and grandeur to it. Domínguez knows how to blend the dance and action elements together in a cohesive score. You will recognize the styles of the composers who influenced him, but his score is original.

This type of cinematic score requires outstanding sound and Naxos delivers. The sound is demonstration quality, possibly the best I’ve ever heard. The Santiago Philharmonic plays expertly. © 2016 American Record Guide Read complete review on American Record Guide



Michael Wilkinson
MusicWeb International, July 2016

José Luis Domínguez, who also conducts on this set, is a significant figure in Chilean music as a conductor. This ballet is his first large-scale symphonic work. It is little surprise that, like many conductor-composers, he has such a sure sense of orchestral balance and capability, something evident throughout this work. © 2016 MusicWeb International Read complete review



Bob McQuiston
Classical Lost and Found, June 2016

Domínguez wears two hats here as composer and conductor leading the Santiago Philharmonic Orchestra in a supercharged performance of this compelling work. What the SPO musicians may lack in technical polish they make up for with their enthusiasm for this music.

Made in the Teatro Municipal’s Arrau Hall, Santiago, Chile, the recording presents a large soundstage appropriate to the massive orchestral forces called for in Dominguez’ Technicolor scoring. The surrounding venue perfectly complements this colorful creation. The instrumental timbre is characterized by sparkling highs and a pleasing midrange. While a boisterous battery of percussion makes for a spectacular, transient low end. © 2016 Classical Lost And Found Read complete review



David Denton
David's Review Corner, June 2016

Born in 1971, José Luis Domínguez has been a prominent figure in his native Chile as a conductor, but at the turn of the century turned his attention to composition. This was soon to bring about a full-length ballet, The Legend of Joaquin Murieta, the story centring on California at the time of the Gold Rush when a North American gang were terrorising the native Americans and the immigrants from South America so as to drive them from that part of the world recently ceded to the USA. Domínguez states that he wants the music to stand alone without the ballet scenario, but I guess you will want to follow the story as set out in the accompanying booklet. Without that you would imagine the score as having come from a leading Hollywood screen writer supplying the backdrop to a highly charged film depicting American life that is long past. Imaginative in his scoring and often reminding of Ferde Grofe’s epic American suites, the music is readily accessible, the first act dance of the drunken gang being very funny, while the second act Pas de deux is an imposing and beautiful score. On stage, this must add-up to a colourful and active ballet with the music as its backdrop. My first encounter with the Santiago Philharmonica is one of admiration for an orchestra that could rival any of North America’s provincial ensembles, with every department displaying their solo skills, and there is certainly no lack of corporate virtuosity. The sound engineering is high on impact, with the Teatro Municipal in Santiago becoming a fine recording venue. © 2016 David’s Review Corner





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