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Kenneth Keaton
American Record Guide, January 2017

The playing is uniformly fine. This music holds no technical challenges to these players, but each performs with artistry and grace. Nothing is eccentric, but neither is their treatment dry, in an attempt to supply a simple model for students first to get the notes right. © 2017 American Record Guide Read complete review on American Record Guide



James Scott
Minor 7th, November 2016

…Norbert Kraft and Jeffrey McFadden trade off, taking the notes from scores written in 1828 to make them sing with the joie de vivre that Sor originally intended. Kraft and McFadden faithfully capture the lilting delight of Op. 31, Nos. 3, 15 and 18, the reverence of Nos. 4, 16 and 18, and the unapologetic verve of Nos. 6, 20 and 21. Norbert Kraft himself is a genius of Sor’s ilk, and not only for his virtuosic playing. He is an unsung present-day steward of guitar music, and as artistic director at the helm of Naxos Records’ Guitar Collection, is personally responsible for producing the most extensive recording project of guitar repertoire ever undertaken. © 2016 Minor 7th Read complete review




KDFC Radio, September 2016

Fernando Sor was not only one of the great guitarists of his era but a major composer for the instrument, described by a contemporary critic as “the Beethoven of the guitar“. His desire for the guitar to represent a miniature orchestra in timbre is a distinctive feature of his many compositions. The 24 Progressive Lessons, Op. 31 offer a panoramic lexicon for the student, moving from a simple waltz to perpetual motion, whilst the charming Six Little Pieces, Op. 32 further explore technical efficiency and musical expressiveness. © 2016 KDFC Radio



Lisa Flynn
WFMT (Chicago), September 2016

Fernando Sor was not only one of the great guitarists of his era but a major composer for the instrument, described by a contemporary critic as “the Beethoven of the guitar.” The 24 Progressive Lessons offer a panoramic lexicon for the student, moving from a simple waltz to perpetual motion, while the charming Six Little Pieces further explore technical efficiency and musical expressiveness. © 2016 WFMT (Chicago)




Blair Sanderson
AllMusic.com, September 2016

These guitarists play with sensitivity and charm, and their recordings, made in 2009, 2012, and 2013 in the same venue, the Green Room, Offord Hall, Aurora, Ontario, are quite consistent in sound quality. © 2016 Allmusic.com Read complete review



David Denton
David's Review Corner, August 2016

Mentor and pupil take us through Fernando Sor’s guitar teaching manual starting out with a relatively simple waltz and ending with a challenging perpetual motion. Sor was one of the greatest guitarists of the early Nineteenth century, and here his music is performed by the Canadian, Norbert Kraft, one of the finest virtuosos of the instrument I have ever encountered. The key to my admiration comes from the strength and perfection of his right hand, that at the same time can coax from the strings the most beautiful sounds. As young guitarists have pointed out to me, the pieces do not fit into a real-time chronological path of teaching, but leap around in the development of technique. Still it does make for interesting listening, Sor seemingly throwing away attractive melodies others would have developed into longer pieces. They were published quite late in a nomadic life as a performing guitarist, interspersed with periods of teaching, his avowed intention being to make the instrument represent the timbres of a small orchestra. Kraft certainly produces a whole spectrum of colours, his Fifteenth lesson being an absolute delight. He shares the disc with his former pupil, the distinguished concert artist, Jeffrey McFadden, who wraps up final tracks of the work and then continues into the delights of the 6 Little Pieces, most of which are in the form of dances. Where has this 2012 recording been hiding? It is one of the redoubtable Norbert Kraft/Bonnie Silver products. © 2016 David’s Review Corner





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