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Rob Barnett
MusicWeb International, January 2019

This music is soft of focus and rounded of edge. That it was written during the dismal depths of the Second World War is remarkable. Its 14 substantial movements as represented here are lively, not lifeless, fizzing rather than flat.

The recording makes capital use of a very lively acoustic. Its considerable virtues are most patently felt in the animated and quiet pizzicato of Sérénade de Mezzetin. © 2019 MusicWeb International Read complete review



Grego Applegate Edwards
Gapplegate Classical-Modern Music Review, January 2018

Capriccio is neither avowedly Modernist nor is it overly Romantic. Perhaps it is rather Neo-Classical in its own way. It is well crafted, well orchestrated and performed with some zeal and precision.

Lajtha turns out to be essential listening for anyone interested in the Hungarian legacy of last century. There is elegance and straightforward attactiveness in the Capriccio score. It is worth hearing, certainly. © 2018 Gapplegate Classical-Modern Music Review Read complete review



Barry Forshaw
Classical CD Choice, December 2017

Slowly but surely, the Naxos label has been reissuing the impressive series of discs of Lajtha’s neglected music which were originally available on the Marco Polo label. Now, finally, the reissue programme is complete, with one of the most attractive entries in the series. László Lajtha is recognised, along with Bartók, Kodály and Dohnányi, as one of the great Hungarian composers of the first half of the 20th century. He established his reputation as his country’s foremost symphonist but also showed a strong affinity for the stage, writing his one-act ballet Capriccio in 1944. Despite the darkness of the times the ballet is filled with light and set in the period around 1700, the age of Watteau. Taking commedia dell’arte as his model, Lajtha’s characterisation brims with wit and elegance. © 2017 Classical CD Choice



Records International, December 2017

Lajtha established his reputation as his country’s foremost symphonist but also showed a strong affinity for the stage, writing his one-act ballet Capriccio in 1944. Despite the darkness of the times the 77-minute ballet is filled with light and set in the period around 1700, the age of Watteau. Taking commedia dell’arte as his model, Lajtha’s characterization brims with wit and elegance. © 2017 Records International



David Denton
David's Review Corner, November 2017

Having recently released the complete symphonies of the Hungarian composer, László Lajtha, Naxos now add the concert suite from his one-act ballet, Capriccio. Written in 1944, in that period when hope was spreading across Europe, and before his nation fell into an even worse political scenario, the ballet, based on characters from the commedia dell’arte, is a story of wit and elegance. Then we find that the people are just puppets in a show, and as such everything has to end happily for all concerned, and, in particularly, the audience. The music goes through aspects when things are not going according to plan for the lovers, but it is essentially a happy and colourful score effectively scored. The composer suggested three possible suites, but this disc combines all fourteen sections, which suggests it is the complete ballet and is quite extended at over seventy minutes. Certainly at the time of this recording in 1994, the ballet had never been staged, and the composer never heard any of it performed before his death in 1963. Now known as the Pannon Philharmonic, the Pécs Symphony Orchestra is situated in the Hungarian city of that name. They are conducted by the South American conductor, Nicolás Pasquet, and without having had a visual contact with the ballet, he would have had to use his own instincts as to the shape of each of the fourteen sections. Taken at face value the orchestral performance is lightweight but totally convincing, and this original Marco Polo recording sounds freshly minted. Much recommended. © 2017 David’s Review Corner



Ronald E. Grames
Fanfare, May 2017

The Kenari Quartet is a very fine ensemble, …A fair amount of its success in this repertoire is attributable to the soprano player’s exceptional feel for the elegance, wit, insouciance, and tonal beauty that are central to French saxophone playing. …While the quartet is pretty impressive in delivering the breathtaking showers of notes that some of the faster movements in this program demand, in the slower music, the nuance and absolute unanimity of vibrato, color, balance, and phrasing which are the passkey to the highest ranks of the saxophone quartet pantheon haven’t yet been perfected.

There is a great deal to enjoy here. This is a young and quite talented saxophone quartet… © 2017 Fanfare Read complete review





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