Classical Music Home

Welcome to Naxos Records

 
Keyword Search
 
 Classical Music Home > Naxos Album Reviews

Album Reviews



 
See latest reviews of other albums...

Marc Rochester
MusicWeb International, December 2019

The year saw a good number of Bach cantata recordings, but for me none matched the exquisite excellence of the three performed by the Thomanerchor Leipzig and Sächsisches Barockorchester under Gotthold Schwarz. I wrote in my original review that “I love this with a passion and have barely been able to rip it out of my CD player since the moment I first put it in and pressed Play”. The passage of time has not in any way diminished my adoration for this gorgeous recording. © 2019 MusicWeb International



J.F. Weber
Fanfare, July 2019

Schwarz has chosen fine soloists. Wagner has sung Bach cantatas with Lutz, Kahler with Biller; the other two soloists have recorded major works (by Bach and others) with several conductors. Kahler has a powerful voice that doesn’t have any of that male-alto thinness, a voice that I’d like to hear in such masterly music as the Agnus Dei from the B-Minor Mass (as Russell Oberlin did under Bernstein). His recitativ in BWV 17 is followed by a stunning aria by Wagner. © 2019 Fanfare Read complete review



William J. Gatens
American Record Guide, July 2019

…Bass Tobias Berndt impressed me with his authoritative assurance and a clarity well suited to Bach’s demanding lines. …  Countertenor Stefan Kahle gives a highly respectable performance… The instrumental playing is outstanding, with luscious tone, great aplomb, and a high technical polish. © 2019 American Record Guide  Read complete review on American Record Guide




Marc Rochester
MusicWeb International, June 2019

I simply, adore the wonderful bell-like quality of Stefan Kahle’s remarkably fluid alto… Bach’s genius was very much in the instrumental writing in these cantatas, and at times there is a strong feeling of concerto-like virtuosity in the often busy and intricate orchestral writing. A particularly satisfying inclusion to the instrumental line-up is the soft-padded tones of an archlute in the continuo.

If only all Bach cantata recordings were like this. Vivid and full of vitality, energetic to the point of exhaustion and so completely committed that it would take a very hard-hearted critic not simply to sit back and allow him or herself to be carried along on by this great wave of musical enthusiasm.

A generous booklet, somewhat (if understandably) focusing on photos of the boys having fun during recording sessions, and a glorious recording in the sumptuously generous acoustic of the Leipzig Lutherkirche rounds off what is, for me at least, one of the most enjoyable of all recordings of Bach cantatas. The suggestion that more are to follow is almost too good to be true. © 2019 MusicWeb International Read complete review



Richard Wigmore
Gramophone, May 2019

Topped by a fresh-toned treble line, the choir of Bach’s own church are in fine shape under Thomaskantor Gotthold Schwarz, and the Sächsische Barockorchester play with style and gusto. © 2019 Gramophone  Read complete review on Gramophone




Uwe Krusch
Pizzicato, March 2019

Bach composed more than 200 cantatas. Three of them are performed in this first recording of a series planned by Gotthold Schwarz, currently Thomaskantor in Leipzig. The choir, the Saxon Baroque Orchestra as well as the four soloists, two of them earlier choir boys, deliver appealing performances of the music. © 2019 Pizzicato




Curtis Rogers
Classicalsource.com, March 2019

Tobias Berndt holds the greater share of the recitatives, which he conveys with authority and conviction. Wolfram Lattke projects fervently, which carries over into his urgent account of BWV33’s duet with Berndt, and an aria of BWV99 which he sings with a certain reedy vigour. He would make an astute Evangelist in the two Passions.

The present Thomaskantor (since 2016) Gotthold Schwarz directs supple and lively accounts throughout, with conspicuous success. The Sächsisches Barockorchester brings out the bustle of BWV33’s first movement with chattering oboes and a rumbling bass line, whilst palpable bite on the choral phrases fills out Bach’s multi-layered soundscape attractively. © 2019 Classicalsource.com Read complete review





Naxos Records, a member of the Naxos Music Group